Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 57.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Jel Classification:F3 

Working Paper
External and Public Debt Crises

The recent debt crises in Europe and the U.S. states feature similar sharp increases in spreads on government debt but also show important differences. In Europe, the crisis occurred at high government indebtedness levels and had spillovers to the private sector. In the United States, state government indebtedness was low, and the crisis had no spillovers to the private sector. We show theoretically and empirically that these different debt experiences result from the interplay between differences in the ability of governments to interfere in private external debt contracts and differences in ...
Working Paper Series , Paper WP-2015-5

Discussion Paper
The Vanishing U.S.-E.U. Employment Gap

The employment-to-population ratio—the share of adults that are employed—has historically been much higher in the United States than in Europe. However, the gap narrowed dramatically in the last decade and had almost disappeared by the end of 2009. In this post, we show that the narrowing employment gap is due to three factors: declining U.S. employment rates across almost all age-gender groups; more women working in Europe, particularly prime-age and older workers; and rising employment for older European men. We link most of these shifts to the influence of underlying trends (many ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20110725

Working Paper
On what states do prices depend? answers from ecuador

In this paper, we argue that differences in the cost structure across sectors play an important role in the decision of firms to adjust their prices. We develop a menu cost model of pricing in which retail firms intermediate trade between producers and consumers. An important facet of our analysis is that the labor-cost share of retail production differs across goods and services in the consumption basket. For example, the price of gasoline at the retail pump is predicted to adjust more frequently and by more than the price of a haircut due to the high volatility in wholesale gasoline prices ...
Globalization Institute Working Papers , Paper 278

Working Paper
The effects of government spending on real exchange rates: evidence from military spending panel data

Using panel data on military spending for 125 countries, we document new facts about the effects of changes in government purchases on the real exchange rate, consumption, and current accounts in both advanced and developing countries. While an increase in government purchases causes real exchange rates to appreciate and increases consumption significantly in developing countries, it causes real exchange rates to depreciate and decreases consumption in advanced countries. The current account deteriorates in both groups of countries. These findings are not consistent with standard ...
Working Papers , Paper 16-14

Working Paper
Cross-border returns differentials

Were the U.S. to persistently earn substantially more on its foreign investments ("U.S. claims") than foreigners earn on their U.S. investments ("U.S. liabilities"), the likelihood that the current environment of sizeable global imbalances will evolve in a benign manner increases. However, we find that the returns differential of U.S. claims over U.S. liabilities is far smaller than previously reported and, importantly, is near zero for portfolio equity and debt securities. ; > For portfolio securities, we confirm our finding using a separate dataset on the actual foreign equity and bond ...
Globalization Institute Working Papers , Paper 04

Working Paper
Does the US current account show a symmetric behavior over the business cycle?

Traditionally, the literature that attempts to explain the link between the current account and output finds a linear negative relationship (e.g., Backus et al., 1995). Using nonparametric regressions, we find a robust U-shaped relationship between the U.S. current account and the GDP cycle. When output is above (below) its trend the current account and detrended output are positively (negatively) correlated. We argue that this nonlinearity might be caused by persistent productivity shocks coupled with uncertainty shocks about future productivity.
Globalization Institute Working Papers , Paper 253

Working Paper
Hot money and quantitative easing: the spillover effect of U.S. monetary policy on Chinese housing, equity and loan markets

We study a factor-augmented vector autoregression model to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. monetary policy, as well as changes in U.S. policy uncertainty, on the Chinese economy. We find that since the Great Recession, a decline in the U.S. policy rate would result in a significant increase in Chinese regulated interest rates, and rise in Chinese housing investment. One possible reason for this is the substantial inflow of hot money into China. Responses of Chinese variables to U.S. shocks at the zero lower bound are different from that in normal times, which suggest structural ...
Globalization Institute Working Papers , Paper 211

Report
Distribution margins, imported inputs, and the sensitivity of the CPI to exchange rates

Border prices of traded goods are highly sensitive to exchange rates; however, the consumer price index (CPI) and the retail prices of goods that make up the CPI are more stable. This paper decomposes the sources of this price stability for twenty-one OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries, focusing on the important role of distribution margins and imported inputs in transmitting exchange rate fluctuations into consumption prices. We provide rich cross-country and cross-industry details on distribution margins and their sensitivity to exchange rates, imported ...
Staff Reports , Paper 247

Working Paper
Disaster Risk and Asset Returns : An International Perspective

Recent studies have shown that disaster risk can generate asset return moments similar to those observed in the U.S. data. However, these studies have ignored the cross-country asset pricing implications of the disaster risk model. This paper shows that standard U.S.-based disaster risk model assumptions found in the literature lead to counterfactual international asset pricing implications. Given consumption pricing moments, disaster risk cannot explain the range of equity premia and government bill rates nor the high degree of equity return correlation found in the data. Moreover, the ...
International Finance Discussion Papers , Paper 1199

Journal Article
Chinese Foreign Exchange Reserves, Policy Choices, and the U.S. Economy

China is both a major trading partner of the United States and the largest official holder of U.S. assets in the world. The value of Chinese foreign exchange reserves peaked at just over $4 trillion in June 2014 but has since declined to $3.19 trillion (as of August 2016). This very large decline in foreign exchange reserves is unprecedented, and some analysts have speculated that continued sales of these (mostly U.S.) assets might significantly impact the U.S. and global economies. This article explains the reasons for this large decline in official assets, China?s available policy choices, ...
Review , Volume 99 , Issue 2

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

Goldberg, Linda S. 7 items

Kollmann, Robert 6 items

Davis, J. Scott 5 items

Curcuru, Stephanie E. 3 items

Humpage, Owen F. 3 items

Zlate, Andrei 3 items

show more (100)

FILTER BY Jel Classification

F4 29 items

E5 15 items

E3 8 items

G15 8 items

E4 6 items

show more (53)

FILTER BY Keywords

Monetary policy 4 items

Federal Reserve 3 items

Sudden stops 3 items

Debt crises 2 items

Even Keel 2 items

Interference with private contracts 2 items

show more (161)

PREVIOUS / NEXT