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Author:Atkinson, Tyler 

Consumers’ and Economists’ Differing Inflation Views Can Complicate Policymaking

Economists and consumers likely think of different concepts when they consider inflation. Economists typically focus on the underlying trend that monetary policy can steer. U.S. consumers appear to think instead about unpredictable changes in prices most relevant to their regular decision-making.
Dallas Fed Economics

Journal Article
America’s Missing Workers Are Primarily Middle Educated

The labor force participation rate has fallen since 2008, partly due to an aging population and despite a more highly educated one. After accounting for aging, those whose highest educational attainment is a high school diploma, some college or an associate degree have primarily driven the participation decrease.
Economic Letter , Volume 12 , Issue 4 , Pages 1-4

Average Inflation over the Pandemic Avoids 'Base-Effect' Distortions

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic early last year, the nation has seen enormous swings in consumer prices, with extraordinary declines last spring giving way to similarly eye-popping increases as the economy has reopened.
Dallas Fed Economics

Journal Article
Assessing the costs and consequences of the 2007–09 financial crisis and its aftermath

There are few estimates of what society gave up due to the crisis: Our conservative estimate is $50,000 to $120,000 for every U.S. household.
Economic Letter , Volume 8 , Issue 7 , Pages 1-4

Changes in Labor Force Participation Help Explain Recent Job Gains

The U.S. labor force participation rate declined following the Great Recession to a low of 62.3 percent in 2015.
Dallas Fed Economics

Journal Article
High unemployment points to below-target (but still stable) inflation

The Federal Reserve has a mandate to promote price stability and full employment. Generally, ?price stability? is given a forward-looking interpretation. Policy should be conducted so that expected medium-term (two- to five-year) inflation is low and stable or, less strictly, so that expected inflation beyond the next few years is low and stable. Households and businesses, too, are generally more interested in where prices are headed than in where they have been.
Economic Letter , Volume 7 , Issue 12 , Pages 1-4

Dallas Fed Mobility and Engagement Index Gives Insight into COVID-19’s Economic Impact

To gain insight into the economic impact of the pandemic, we developed an index of mobility and engagement, based on geolocation data collected from a large sample of mobile devices.
Dallas Fed Economics

The Labor Market May Be Tighter than the Level of Employment Suggests

Nonfarm payroll employment disappointed in April, increasing just 266,000, well below consensus expectations of nearly 1 million new jobs. With payroll employment remaining well below its prior peak, slow job growth would typically suggest weak demand for labor from firms and limited employment opportunities for job seekers. Current conditions in the labor market, however, may be far from typical.
Dallas Fed Economics

Discussion Paper
How bad was it? The costs and consequences of the 2007–09 financial crisis

The 2007?09 financial crisis was associated with a huge loss of economic output and financial wealth, psychological consequences and skill atrophy from extended unemployment, an increase in government intervention, and other significant costs. Assuming the financial crisis is to blame for these associated ills, an estimate of its cost is needed to weigh against the cost of policies intended to prevent similar episodes. We conservatively estimate that 40 to 90 percent of one year's output ($6 trillion to $14 trillion, the equivalent of $50,000 to $120,000 for every U.S. household) was foregone ...
Staff Papers , Issue Jul

Journal Article
Is rising unemployment an early warning of state-level recession?

Based on experience with national unemployment, analysts have viewed sharply higher state joblessness as signaling possible further deterioration. However, analyses indicate increasing state-level unemployment by itself does not indicate a recession, and that applying rule-of-thumb properties regarding recession to state economies is misguided.
Economic Letter , Volume 11 , Issue 8 , Pages 1-4

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