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Bank:Federal Reserve Bank of New York  Series:Economic Policy Review 

Journal Article
Sources of New York employment fluctuations

The authors analyze employment growth in the metropolitan region and its relationship to employment in the United States as a whole. They identify a strong cyclical link between the region and the nation, punctuated by occasional, persistent shifts in the region's underlying growth rate. Some shifts are found to be related to industry factors, such as the restructuring of financial services in the late 1980s. However, the authors attribute a large and increasing share of New York employment fluctuations to region-specific factors.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 3 , Issue Feb , Pages 21-35

Journal Article
Performance of metropolitan area industries

In the New York metropolitan region, job losses have been more severe and economic recovery slower than in most other metropolitan areas. But a more interesting, and less pessimistic, story is revealed by regional income: an analysis of aggregate earnings shows that incomes in the region are higher now, in real terms, than they were in 1988. That rise, the author contends, reflects increased productivity and a potential shift in industry composition from less productive to more productive industries.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 3 , Issue Feb , Pages 49-60

Journal Article
Technology: driving specialization or enabling diversification (or both)?

Economic Policy Review , Issue Oct , Pages 67-72

Journal Article
Capital regulations: the road ahead

This paper was presented at the conference "Financial services at the crossroads: capital regulation in the twenty-first century" as part of session 7, "The future of capital regulation." The conference, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on February 26-27, 1998, was designed to encourage a consensus between the public and private sectors on an agenda for capital regulation in the new century.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 231-235

Journal Article
Commentary on The recession of 2001 and unemployment insurance financing

Proceedings of a Conference Cosponsored by the Canadian Consulate General in New York, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and the New York Association for Business Economics.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 81-84

Journal Article
The Gordon Gekko effect: the role of culture in the financial industry

Culture is a potent force in shaping individual and group behavior, yet it has received scant attention in the context of financial risk management and the 2007-09 financial crisis. This article presents a brief overview of the role of culture as it is seen by psychologists, sociologists, and economists, and then describes a specific framework for analyzing culture in the context of financial practices and institutions. Using this framework, the author addresses three questions: (1) what is culture? (2) does it matter? and (3) can it be changed? He illustrates the utility of this framework by ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 17-42

Journal Article
Formulas or supervision? Remarks on the future of regulatory capital

This paper was presented at the conference "Financial services at the crossroads: capital regulation in the twenty-first century" as part of session 6, "The role of capital regulation in bank supervision." The conference, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on February 26-27, 1998, was designed to encourage a consensus between the public and private sectors on an agenda for capital regulation in the new century.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 191-200

Journal Article
The Main Street Lending Program

The Main Street Lending Program was created to support credit to small and medium-sized businesses and nonprofit organizations that were harmed by the pandemic, particularly those that were unsupported by other pandemic-response programs. It was the most direct involvement in the business loan market by the Federal Reserve since the 1930s and 1940s. Main Street operated by buying 95 percent participations in standardized loans from lenders (mostly banks) and sharing the credit risk with them. It would end up supporting loans to more than 2,400 borrowers and co-borrowers across the United ...
Economic Policy Review , Volume 28 , Issue 1

Journal Article
Public education in the dynamic city: lessons from New York City

This article was presented at a conference organized by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in April 2005, "Urban Dynamics in New York City." The goal of the conference was threefold: to examine the historical transformations of the engine-of-growth industries in New York and distill the main determinants of the city's historical dominance as well as the challenges to its continued success; to study the nature and evolution of immigration flows into New York; and to analyze recent trends in a range of socioeconomic outcomes, both for the general population and recent immigrants more ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Dec , Pages 157-172

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