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Bank:Federal Reserve Bank of Boston  Series:New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief 

Briefing
Evictions in New England and the Impact of Public Policy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

To stave off a flood of evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic, which was the feared outcome when millions of renting households were suddenly unemployed, Congress and many states implemented policies that included eviction moratoriums and federally funded rental-assistance programs. These programs succeeded in keeping millions of renters housed and driving eviction rates down in the early months of the pandemic. The number of evictions filed in New England declined 56 percent in 2020 and 39 percent in 2021 compared with the average number of evictions filed annually from 2017 through ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2022-2

Briefing
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on New England Homeowners and Renters

Job losses and likely layoffs related to the COVID-19 pandemic will put many New England residents at risk of not being able to pay their mortgage or rent and needing financial assistance and state-government safeguards to remain in their homes. Economic interventions from Congress, primarily through the federal CARES Act, include direct payments to households and increased unemployment insurance benefits that are expected to provide vital support to many of these households for the next three to four months. Even with these efforts, 2 to 3 percent of New England homeowners and 9 to 13 ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2020-02

Briefing
Declining access to health care in northern New England

Access to health care is a major concern across the northern New England states?Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont?where rising operating costs and population loss threaten the stability of hospitals and other medical facilities that serve their surrounding rural communities. New analysis of financial data shows that many rural hospitals are operating at losses that are predictive of financial distress or even closure. Consequently, the communities served by these hospitals may be at risk of losing the benefits they provide to public health and the local economy. Addressing the financial ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 19-1

Briefing
The COVID-19 Pandemic’s Impact on Public Transportation Ridership and Revenues across New England

In New England and elsewhere, public transportation was among the many sectors immediately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Essential workers and members of the labor force with no teleworking options and no alternate means of transportation continued to rely on public transit following the onset of the pandemic. However, with business closures, event cancellations, and social distancing regulations in effect, ridership dropped sharply, hampering transit systems’ ability to generate revenue. As of June 2021, ridership remained depressed despite the relaxation of restrictions and a general ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2021-2

Briefing
Aging and declining populations in northern New England: is there a role for immigration?

In hundreds of communities across northern New England, the population is aging rapidly and becoming smaller. The entire country is aging, but northern New England stands out: Among the populations of all US states, those of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have the top-three highest median ages, respectively. The situation is even more extreme in northern New England?s rural counties, where the populations of the smallest towns generally are substantially older than those of the rest of the region. These communities also have seen the slowest, or even negative, population growth over the ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 19-2

Briefing
Recent Trends in Residential Segregation in New England

Residential segregation in Boston has drawn considerable attention in recent years, but much less notice has been given to the issue with respect to the rest of New England. This regional brief focuses on residential segregation between all minority groups and non-Hispanic white residents in metro areas throughout the region. New England’s population is predominately non-Hispanic white; however, the region has diversified considerably since 1990, as most of the population growth has occurred among minority groups. Residential segregation by race/ethnicity declined over that same period in ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2020-01

Briefing
Recent Trends in Infrastructure Investment and Capacity in New England

Households and businesses throughout New England rely on roads, bridges, dams, sewers, drinking water systems, and other elements of public infrastructure daily. However, the region’s states and municipalities have long been acknowledged as spending less than much of the rest of country on these public capital assets. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021 (IIJA) represents a massive and historic opportunity that will fund billions of dollars’ worth of repairs and improvements to public infrastructure across the region. The $1.2 trillion package contains $550 billion in new ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2022-1

Briefing
Rental Affordability and COVID-19 in Rural New England

Although a shortage of affordable rental housing is often framed as an urban-area issue, rural communities also suffer from this problem. On average, rural and urban renters spend similar shares of their income on rent and have comparable rates of housing-cost burden. Years of slow income growth and skyrocketing rents, particularly during the 2000–2010 period, have eroded slack in household budgets that may have gone toward other expenses or toward savings. The coronavirus pandemic likely has exacerbated affordability problems by putting many rural residents out of work. The share of jobs ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2021-1

Briefing
College Towns and COVID-19: The Impact on New England

The abrupt closing of college campuses this spring due to the spread of COVID-19 upended the lives of students and their families and disrupted the higher education sector. The impact of these closures and the questions of whether and how to reopen campuses this fall have been widely discussed. Less attention has been paid to the potential consequences for the local economies of the cities and towns that depend heavily on higher education. This issue is particularly important in New England, where in many communities, colleges and universities are among the largest employers and make an ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2020-3

Briefing
Recent Migration and Visa Trends in New England and Implications for the Labor Market

From 2010 to 2021, 56 percent of the total population growth in New England came from increases in foreign-born residents. The labor force participation rate of foreign-born residents in the region in 2022 was 4 percentage points higher than that of native-born residents. While numbers of J-1 visa workers and international students in the region have declined, overall temporary employment visa use in the region has continued to rise.
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 2023-1

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