Search Results

Showing results 1 to 3 of approximately 3.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Keywords:working from home 

Working Paper
Work from Home After the COVID-19 Outbreak

Based on rich novel survey data on almost 5,000 working age adults, we document that 35.2 percent of the workforce worked entirely from home in May 2020, up from 8.2 percent in February 2020. Highly educated, high-income and white individuals were much more likely to shift to remote work and to maintain employment following the virus outbreak. Using available estimates of the potential number of home-based workers suggests that a large majority (71.7 percent) of U.S. workers that could work from home, effectively did so in May. We provide some evidence indicating that apart from the potential ...
Working Papers , Paper 2017

Working Paper
Work from Home After the COVID-19 Outbreak

Based on rich novel survey data, we document that 35.2 percent of the US workforce worked entirely from home in May 2020, up from 8.2 percent in February. Highly educated, high-income and white workers were more likely to shift to working from home and maintain employment following the pandemic. Individuals working from home daily before the pandemic lost employment at similar rates as daily commuters. This suggests that, apart from the potential for home-based work, demand conditions also mattered for job losses. We find that 71.7 percent of workers that could work from home effectively did ...
Working Papers , Paper 2017

Working Paper
COVID-19 Is a Persistent Reallocation Shock

Drawing on data from the firm-level Survey of Business Uncertainty, we present three pieces of evidence that COVID-19 is a persistent reallocation shock. First, rates of excess job and sales reallocation over 24-month periods have risen sharply since the pandemic struck, especially for sales. We compute these rates by aggregating over monthly firm-level observations that look back 12 months and ahead 12 months. Second, as of December 2020, firm-level forecasts of sales revenue growth over the next year imply a continuation of recent changes, not a reversal. Third, COVID-19 shifted relative ...
FRB Atlanta Working Paper , Paper 2021-3

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Series

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

Bick, Alexander 2 items

Blandin, Adam 2 items

Mertens, Karel 2 items

Barrero, Jose Maria 1 items

Bloom, Nicholas 1 items

Davis, Steven J. 1 items

show more (2)

FILTER BY Jel Classification

I18 2 items

J1 2 items

J2 2 items

J22 2 items

R4 2 items

D22 1 items

show more (7)

FILTER BY Keywords

PREVIOUS / NEXT