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Keywords:time consistency 

Report
Resolving “Too Big to Fail”

Using a synthetic control research design, we find that ?living will? regulation increases a bank?s annual cost of capital by 22 basis points, or 10 percent of total funding costs. This effect is stronger in banks that were measured as systemically important before the regulation?s announcement. We interpret our findings as a reduction in ?too big to fail? subsidies. The size of this effect is large: a back-of-the-envelope calculation implies a subsidy reduction of $42 billion annually. The impact on equity costs drives the main effect. The impact on deposit costs is statistically ...
Staff Reports , Paper 859

Working Paper
Federal Reserve Structure and the Production of Monetary Policy Ideas

We evaluate the decentralized structure of the Federal Reserve System as a mechanism for generating and processing new ideas on monetary policy over the 1960 - 2000 period. We document the introduction of monetarism, rational expectations, credibility, transparency, and other monetary policy ideas by Reserve Banks into the Federal Reserve System. We argue that the Reserve Banks were willing to support and develop new ideas due to internal reforms to the FOMC that Chairman William McChesney Martin implemented in the 1950s and the increased ties with academia that developed in this period. ...
Working Papers , Paper 23-29

Working Paper
Reputation and Liquidity Traps

Can the central bank credibly commit to keeping the nominal interest rate low for an extended period of time in the aftermath of a deep recession? By analyzing credible plans in a sticky-price economy with occasionally binding zero lower bound constraints, I find that the answer is yes if contractionary shocks hit the economy with sufficient frequency. In the best credible plan, if the central bank reneges on the promise of low policy rates, it will lose reputation and the private sector will not believe such promises in future recessions. When the shock hits the economy sufficiently ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2014-50

Working Paper
On Monetary Policy, Model Uncertainty, and Credibility

This paper studies the design of optimal time-consistent monetary policy in an economy where the planner and a representative household are faced with model uncertainty: While they are able to construct and agree on a reference model (probability distribution) governing the evolution of the exogenous state of the economy, a representative household has fragile beliefs and is averse to model uncertainty. In such environments, management of households' expectations becomes an active channel of optimal policymaking per se. A central banker who respects the fact that private sector models are ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2022-082

Working Paper
Origins of Too-Big-to-Fail Policy

This paper traces the origin of the too-big-to-fail problem in banking to the bailout of the $1.2 billion Bank of the Commonwealth in 1972. It describes this bailout and those of subsequent banks through that of Continental Illinois in 1984. Motivations behind the bailouts are described with a particular emphasis on those provided by Irvine Sprague in his book Bailout. During this period, market concentration due to interstate banking restrictions is a factor in most of the bailouts, and systemic risk concerns were raised to justify the bailouts of surprisingly small banks. Sprague?s ...
Working Papers (Old Series) , Paper 1710

Working Paper
Optimal monetary policy under model uncertainty without commitment

This paper studies the design of optimal time-consistent monetary policy in an economy where the planner trusts its own model, while a representative household uses a set of alternative probability distributions governing the evolution of the exogenous state of the economy. In such environments, unlike in the original studies of time-consistent monetary policy, managing households' expectations becomes an active channel of optimal policymaking per se, a feature that the paternalistic government seeks to exploit. We adapt recursive methods in the spirit of Abreu, Pearce, and Stacchetti (1990) ...
Working Papers , Paper 13-20

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