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Keywords:loans 

Discussion Paper
Did Banks Subject to LCR Reduce Liquidity Creation?

Banks traditionally provide loans that are funded mostly by deposits and thereby create liquidity, which benefits the economy. However, since the loans are typically long-term and illiquid, whereas the deposits are short-term and liquid, this creation of liquidity entails risk for the bank because of the possibility that depositors may ?run? (that is, withdraw their deposits on short notice). To mitigate this risk, regulators implemented the liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) following the financial crisis of 2007-08, mandating banks to hold a buffer of liquid assets. A side effect ofthe ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20181015

Report
Money, credit, monetary policy, and the business cycle in the euro area: what has changed since the crisis?

This paper studies the relationship between the business cycle and financial intermediation in the euro area. We establish stylized facts and study their stability during the global financial crisis and the European sovereign debt crisis. Long-term interest rates have been exceptionally high and long-term loans and deposits exceptionally low since the Lehman collapse. Instead, short-term interest rates and short-term loans and deposits did not show abnormal dynamics in the course of the financial and sovereign debt crisis.
Staff Reports , Paper 885

Journal Article
The Rise in Loan-to-Deposit Ratios: Is 80 the New 60?

Liquidity ratios at small banks have climbed in recent decades. Why has this happened? Should regulators be concerned? A traditional signal that a bank may not have enough liquid assets to cover a sudden loss of funding has increased dramatically at small banks in recent decades. Small banks? median ratio of the value of their loans outstanding to the value of their deposits has risen from around 60 percent in the second half of the 1980s to around 80 percent today. Meanwhile, the same measure of liquidity has increased about 5 percentage points at large banks. How can we explain this big ...
Banking Trends , Issue Q3 , Pages 18-23

Newsletter
Flooding and Finances: Hurricane Harvey’s Impact on Consumer Credit

This article examines consumers? borrowing behavior and debt levels in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. We find that high levels of flooding from Harvey were associated with modest increases in auto loan balances, but moderate decreases in mortgage balances. In general, the storm did not hurt consumers? credit access according to the limited measures we investigate. These results are influenced by a number of factors, including federal disaster assistance, insurance payouts, and creditors permitting temporary postponements in loan payments, with such delays not being reported to credit bureaus.
Chicago Fed Letter

Journal Article
Recent Borrowing from the U.S. Discount Window: Some Cases

The Fed's discount window makes loans to depository institutions on a regular basis. Recent publicly available transaction-level data permit a closer look at the particular circumstances under which some of those loans happened. The analysis of nine specific cases produces some general insights that can be useful in evaluating whether the discount window should be open to making loans during periods of relatively calm financial conditions.
Economic Quarterly , Issue 4Q , Pages 251-271

Journal Article
The Rise in Loan-to-Deposit Ratios: Is 80 the New 60?

Liquidity ratios at small banks have climbed in recent decades. Why has this happened? Should regulators be concerned? A traditional signal that a bank may not have enough liquid assets to cover a sudden loss of funding has increased dramatically at small banks in recent decades. Small banks? median ratio of the value of their loans outstanding to the value of their deposits has risen from around 60 percent in the second half of the 1980s to around 80 percent today. Meanwhile, the same measure of liquidity has increased about 5 percentage points at large banks. How can we explain this big ...
Economic Insights , Volume 2 , Issue 3 , Pages 18-23

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