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Keywords:housing supply 

Report
Addressing Housing Shortages through Tax Abatement

Rising rents, often attributed to a shortage of available housing, spotlight the urgent need to accelerate housing construction, particularly in Boston and other “superstar cities” where rents have been rising acutely. This report looks at the potential efficacy and costs of one particular policy option to jump-start residential construction: incentivizing developers to build by granting them tax abatements for new construction.
Current Policy Perspectives , Paper 2024-2

Working Paper
Report on the Potential Impacts of Property Tax Abatement on Rental Housing Construction in Boston

Boston’s high housing costs reflect a historic failure to build enough units to satisfy demand. Interest rates and construction costs have risen recently, and the flow of new market-rate residential housing projects has slowed. To spur more construction, the City of Boston is considering various policy options. Our committee was asked by Boston Mayor Michelle Wu to assess the market impacts of one of these options: real estate tax abatements. This report presents our analysis of the likely effects on the number of units constructed and the costs to taxpayers of various tax abatement ...
Working Papers , Paper 24-1

Working Paper
Report on the Potential Impacts of Property Tax Abatement on Rental Housing Construction in Boston

Boston’s high housing costs reflect a historic failure to build enough units to satisfy demand. Interest rates and construction costs have risen recently, and the flow of new market-rate residential housing projects has slowed. To spur more construction, the City of Boston is considering various policy options. Our committee was asked by Boston Mayor Michelle Wu to assess the market impacts of one of these options: real estate tax abatements. This report presents our analysis of the likely effects on the number of units constructed and the costs to taxpayers of various tax abatement ...
Working Papers , Paper 24-1

Working Paper
Equilibrium Evictions

We develop a simple equilibrium model of rental markets for housing in which eviction occurs endogenously. Both landlords and renters lack commitment; a landlord evicts a delinquent tenant if they do not expect total future rent payments to cover costs, while tenants cannot commit to paying more rent than they would be able or willing to pay given their outside option of searching for a new house. Renters who are persistently delinquent are more likely to be evicted and pay more per quality-adjusted unit of housing than renters who are less likely to be delinquent. Evictions are never ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 23-03

Journal Article
Upfront: New from the Richmond Fed’s Regional Matters blog

Multiple blog posts.
Econ Focus , Volume 24 , Issue 1Q/2Q , Pages 3

What Are the Long-run Trade-offs of Rent-Control Policies?

While rent-control policies can mean more affordable housing for some, research shows they can also lead to a decline in the supply and quality of rental housing.
On the Economy

Working Paper
The Push of Big City Prices and the Pull of Small Town Amenities

As house prices continue to rise in large, supply-constrained cities, what are the implications for other places that have room to grow? Recent literature suggests that amenities that improve quality of life are becoming increasingly important in location decisions. In this paper, we explore how location amenities have differentially driven population and price dynamics in small towns versus big cities, with a focus on the role of housing supply. We provide theory and evidence that demand for high-amenity locations has increased in recent decades. High-amenity counties in large metropolitan ...
Working Papers , Paper 22-41

Working Paper
The Effect of Second-Generation Rent Controls: New Evidence from Catalonia

Catalonia enacted a second-generation rental cap policy that affected only some municipalities and, within those, only units with prices above their “reference” price. We show that, as intended, the policy led to a reduction in rental prices, but with price increases at the bottom and price declines at the top of the distribution. The policy also affected supply, with exit at the top which is not compensated by entry at the bottom. We show that a model with quality differences in rental units rationalizes the empirical facts and allows us to compute the welfare consequences of the policy.
Working Paper Series , Paper 2023-28

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