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Keywords:housing 

Working Paper
Financial Business Cycles

Using Bayesian methods, I estimate a DSGE model where a recession is initiated by losses suffered by banks and exacerbated by their inability to extend credit to the real sector. The event triggering the recession has the workings of a redistribution shock: a small sector of the economy -- borrowers who use their home as collateral -- defaults on their loans. When banks hold little equity in excess of regulatory requirements, the losses require them to react immediately, either by recapitalizing or by deleveraging. By deleveraging, banks transform the initial shock into a credit crunch, and, ...
International Finance Discussion Papers , Paper 1116

Journal Article
A Look at Detroit's Affordable Housing Market

The foreclosure crisis had a significant impact on Detroit's home ownership rates. The 2000 and 2010 censuses indicate that the homeownership rate in Detroit was 54.9 percent and 51.1 percent, respectively. According to the 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, the current rate is below 50 percent. Detroit now has more renters than homeowners. As more residents move from homeownership, increased focus is being placed on the city?s rental housing market and the findings are not entirely favorable.
Profitwise , Issue 2 , Pages 4-7

Journal Article
Three Delaware Agencies Craft Program That Combines Housing Subsidies and Supportive Services

In 2010, the Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA) partnered with two of its sister state agencies to create an innovative new program designed to meet the needs of some of Delaware?s most vulnerable citizens. The State Rental Assistance Program (SRAP) couples tenant-based housing subsidies provided by DSHA with supportive services provided by the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) and the Department of Services for Children, Youth, and Their Families (DSCYF).
Cascade , Volume 1

Journal Article
Spotlight on Research: Housing Options for Homeless Families

Homelessness in the U.S. continues to be a pressing issue. It is generally thought to involve only single men and women. However, according to a 2010 report to Congress, about one-third of the homeless are families.1 While the need for housing for homeless families is a foregone conclusion, the type of housing that best fosters residential stability and self-sufficiency remains at issue. A recent report by the National Center on Family Homelessness sheds light on this topic.2 The following is a summary of that report.
Cascade , Volume 1

Journal Article
Coalition Helps Returning Citizens Move from Corrections to Communities

A number of state and local agencies in Pennsylvania are partnering to support the successful transition of ex-offenders who are returning to communities. This partnership ensures compliance with parole and supervised release requirements and makes meaningful connections to housing, training, and employment that can help reduce the likelihood of reoffense.
Cascade , Volume 3

Report
Affordability and Availability of Rental Housing in the Third Federal Reserve District: 2015

In the aftermath of the foreclosure crisis and subsequent tightening of mortgage credit, many households have turned to the rental housing market, increasing pressure on an already limited supply of low-cost units. Using the most recent data available, this issue of Cascade Focus analyzes trends in rental housing affordability in the Third Federal Reserve District between 2007 and 2012. In addition to examining rates of housing cost burden for low-income renter households, this analysis evaluates whether the supply of affordable rental units is sufficient to meet the need. Lastly, this report ...
Cascade Focus

Discussion Paper
Introduction to Heterogeneity Series III: Credit Market Outcomes

Average economic outcomes serve as important indicators of the overall state of the economy. However, they mask a lot of underlying variability in how people experience the economy across geography, or by race, income, age, or other attributes. Following our series on heterogeneity broadly in October 2019 and in labor market outcomes in March 2020, we now turn our focus to further documenting heterogeneity in the credit market. While we have written about credit market heterogeneity before, this series integrates insights on disparities in outcomes in various parts of the credit market. The ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20200707b

Working Paper
Portfolio choice with house value misperception

Households systematically overvalue or undervalue their houses. We compute house value misperception as the difference between self-reported and market house values. Misperception is sizable, countercyclical, and persistent. We find that a 1 percent increase in house overvaluation results, on average, in a 4.56 percent decrease in the share of risky stock holdings for those households that participate in the stock market. We then build a rational inattention model in which households make decisions based on their perceived level of housing wealth. Numerical simulations generate the effects of ...
Working Papers , Paper 17-16

Discussion Paper
Do People View Housing as a Good Investment and Why?

Housing represents the largest asset owned by most households and is a major means of wealth accumulation, particularly for the middle class. Yet there is limited understanding of how households view housing as an investment relative to financial assets, in part because of their differences beyond the usual risk and return trade-off. Housing offers households an accessible source of leverage and a commitment device for saving through an amortization schedule. For an owner-occupied residence, it also provides stability and hedges for rising housing costs. On the other hand, housing is much ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20210405b

Discussion Paper
Do People View Housing as a Good Investment and Why?

Housing represents the largest asset owned by most households and is a major means of wealth accumulation, particularly for the middle class. Yet there is limited understanding of how households view housing as an investment relative to financial assets, in part because of their differences beyond the usual risk and return trade-off. Housing offers households an accessible source of leverage and a commitment device for saving through an amortization schedule. For an owner-occupied residence, it also provides stability and hedges for rising housing costs. On the other hand, housing is much ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20210405b

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Haughwout, Andrew F. 6 items

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