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Keywords:health care OR Health care 

Newsletter
Check Up Before You Check Out

Retail clinics offer convenient, low-cost preventive health care and treatment for minor injury and illness. When a retail clinic opens, the rate of visits to the emergency room for these low-severity conditions declines for people who live in close proximity.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue 428

Working Paper
Financial Incentives, Hospital Care, and Health Outcomes: Evidence from Fair Pricing Laws

It is often assumed that financial incentives of healthcare providers affect the care they deliver, but this issue is surprisingly difficult to study. The recent enactment of state laws that limit how much hospitals can charge uninsured patients provide a unique opportunity. Using an event study framework and panel data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we examine whether these regulations lead to reductions in the amount and quality of care given to uninsured patients. We find that the introduction of a fair pricing law leads to a seven to nine percent reduction in the average length of ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2015-107

Working Paper
Health Insurance and Hospital Supply: Evidence from 1950s Coal Country

The United States government spends billions on public health insurance and has funded a number of programs to build health care facilities. However, the government runs these two types of programs separately: in different places, at different times, and for different populations. We explore whether access to both health insurance and hospitals can improve health outcomes and access to health care. We analyze a coal mining union health insurance program in 1950s Appalachia with and without a complementary hospital construction program. Our results show that the union insurance alone increased ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2020-033

Report
On Financing Retirement, Health Care, and Long-Term Care in Japan

Japan is facing the problem of how to finance retirement, health care, and long-term care expenditures as the population ages. This paper analyzes the impact of policy options intended to address this problem by employing a dynamic general equilibrium overlapping generations model, specifically parameterized to match both the macro- and microeconomic level data of Japan. We find that financing the costs of aging through gradual increases in the consumption tax rate delivers better macroeconomic performance and higher welfare for most individuals relative to other financing options, including ...
Staff Report , Paper 586

Briefing
Declining access to health care in northern New England

Access to health care is a major concern across the northern New England states?Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont?where rising operating costs and population loss threaten the stability of hospitals and other medical facilities that serve their surrounding rural communities. New analysis of financial data shows that many rural hospitals are operating at losses that are predictive of financial distress or even closure. Consequently, the communities served by these hospitals may be at risk of losing the benefits they provide to public health and the local economy. Addressing the financial ...
New England Public Policy Center Regional Brief , Paper 19-1

Journal Article
An Ounce of Prevention

Research Spotlight on the following paper: "The Effect of Primary Care Visits on Health Care Utilization: Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial." Cathy J. Bradley, David Neumark, and Lauryn Saxe Walker. National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No. 24100, December 2017.
Econ Focus , Issue 4Q , Pages 9-9

Discussion Paper
Hospital Access in the Fifth District and COVID-19

Having enough hospital capacity to treat critical patients has been a major concern during the COVID-19 outbreak. What does hospital capacity look like in the Fifth Federal Reserve District, and how might rural hospital closings impact the current crisis?
Regional Matters

Briefing
Medical Spending in Old Age

Older Americans' health care spending is relevant to many policy questions. Recent research shows that spending varies considerably with income, as do funding sources for that spending. Overall, the government pays more for lower-income individuals than higher-income individuals, but Medicaid is not just a program for the young and the poor. It provides substantial benefits to older adults with higher incomes as well.
Richmond Fed Economic Brief , Issue May

Report
Implications of Increasing College Attainment for Aging in General Equilibrium

We develop and calibrate an overlapping generations general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy with heterogeneous consumers who face idiosyncratic earnings and health risk to study the implications of exogenous trends in increasing college attainment, decreasing fertility, and increasing longevity between 2005 and 2100. While all three trends contribute to a higher old age dependency ratio, increasing college attainment has different macroeconomic implications because it increases labor productivity. Decreasing fertility and increasing longevity require the government to increase the ...
Staff Report , Paper 583

Newsletter
The Recent Rise in Health Care Inflation

Health care services inflation was consistently at or above 3% per year in the early 2000s, declined from around 3% at the end of the 2000s to under 1% in 2015, and then rebounded to just under 2% in early 2018. The low point in 2015 was a near-historical low, with health care services price growth bottoming out at a rate not seen since 1961.
Chicago Fed Letter

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