Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 15.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Keywords:diversity 

Discussion Paper
Which Workers Bear the Burden of Social Distancing Policies?

In the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, nearly all U.S. states imposed social distancing policies to combat the spread of illness. To the extent that work can be done from home, some workers moved their offices to their abodes. Others, however, are unable to continue working as their usual tasks require a specific location or environment, or involve close proximity to others. Which types of jobs cannot be done from home and which types of jobs require close personal proximity to others? What share of overall U.S. employment falls in these categories? And, given that these jobs will be the ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20200529b

Discussion Paper
Distribution of COVID-19 Incidence by Geography, Race, and Income

In this post, we study whether (and how) the spread of COVID-19 across the United States has varied by geography, race, income, and population density. Have urban areas been more affected by COVID-19 than rural areas? Has population density mattered in the spread? Has the coronavirus's impact varied by race and income? Our analysis uncovers stark demographic and geographic differences in the effects of the pandemic thus far.
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20200615

Speech
The evolving first line of defense: keynote address at the 1LoD Summit, New York City

Keynote address at the 1LoD Summit, New York City.
Speech , Paper 278

Working Paper
Foreclosure Externalities and Vacant Property Registration Ordinances

This paper tests the effectiveness of vacant property registration ordinances (VPROs) in reducing negative externalities from foreclosures. VPROs were widely adopted by local governments across the United States during the foreclosure crisis and facilitated the monitoring and enforcement of existing property maintenance laws. We implement a border discontinuity design combined with a triple-difference specification to overcome policy endogeneity concerns, and we find that the enactment of VPROs in Florida more than halved the negative externality from foreclosure. This finding is robust to a ...
FRB Atlanta Working Paper , Paper 2019-20

Working Paper
Bundling Time and Goods: Implications for Hours Dispersion

We document the large dispersion in hours worked in the cross-section. We account for this fact using a model in which households combine market inputs and time to produce a set of nonmarket activities. To estimate the model, we create a novel data set that pairs market expenditures and time use at the activity level using data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey and the American Time Use Survey, respectively. The estimated model can account for a large fraction of the dispersion of hours worked in the data. The substitutability between market inputs and time within an activity and across a ...
FRB Atlanta Working Paper , Paper 2020-1

Working Paper
Low-Income Consumers and Payment Choice

Low-income consumers are not only constrained with spending, but also with the type and variety of payment methods available to them. Using a representative sample of the U.S. adult population, this paper analyzes the low possession (adoption) of credit and debit cards among low-income consumers who are also unbanked. Using a random utility model, I estimate the potential welfare gains associated with policy options suggested in the literature to provide subsidized and unsubsidized debit cards to this consumer population.
FRB Atlanta Working Paper , Paper 2020-3

Speech
Transcript of Fireside Chat at Rutgers University—New Brunswick: November 29, 2017

Transcript of Fireside Chat at Rutgers University?New Brunswick: November 29, 2017.
Speech , Paper 265

Speech
Opening Remarks: Heterogeneity Blog Series Webinar

Remarks for the Heterogeneity Blog Series Webinar, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York City.
Speech

Report
Home Improvement Lending in the Third Federal Reserve District: Patterns by Income, Race, and Gender

Historically, local, state, and federal policies in the U.S. have encouraged households of all backgrounds to pursue homeownership because of the various benefits of owning a home, such as wealth building, protection against housing cost inflation, and psychological well-being, among others.1 Research has demonstrated that the financial, physical, and psychological benefits associated with owning a home have accrued to homeowners of all stripes. However, LMI, minority, and elderly households often face financial barriers to sustaining homeownership over the long run.
Cascade Focus

Discussion Paper
Medicare and Financial Health across the United States

Consumer financial strain varies enormously across the United States. One pernicious source of financial strain is debt in collections—debt that is more than 120 days past due and that has been sold to a collections agency. In Massachusetts, the average person has less than $100 in collections debt, while in Texas, the average person has more than $300. In this post, we discuss our recent staff report that exploits the fact that virtually all Americans are universally covered by Medicare at 65 to show that health insurance not only improves financial health on average, but also is a major ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20200708e

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Series

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Jel Classification

D14 4 items

I14 2 items

Q12 2 items

D11 1 items

D90 1 items

E21 1 items

show more (11)

FILTER BY Keywords

diversity 15 items

homeownership 3 items

race 3 items

COVID-19 2 items

demographics 2 items

heterogeneity 2 items

show more (77)

PREVIOUS / NEXT