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Keywords:adjustable-rate mortgages 

Report
Payment size, negative equity, and mortgage default

Surprisingly little is known about the importance of mortgage payment size for default, as efforts to measure the treatment effect of rate increases or loan modifications are confounded by borrower selection. We study a sample of hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages that have experienced substantial rate reductions over the past years and are largely immune to these selection concerns. We find that payment size has an economically large effect on repayment behavior; for instance, cutting the required payment in half reduces the delinquency hazard by about 55 percent. Importantly, the link between ...
Staff Reports , Paper 582

Journal Article
Alternatives to Libor in consumer mortgages

Many adjustable rate mortgages in the United States are indexed to Libor. While the accuracy of this rate has recently been called into question, another issue affecting U.S. borrowers has become evident since the onset of the financial crisis. Specifically, many U.S. consumers with Libor-based loans may have been hit with substantially higher payments when their loans reset during the financial crisis than if those loans had been tied to a Treasury rate. We investigate several alternative reference rates for consumer loans and estimate their payment effects on a large sample of Libor-linked ...
Economic Commentary , Issue Oct

Working Paper
The termination of subprime hybrid and fixed rate mortgages

Adjustable rate and hybrid loans have been a large and important component of subprime lending in the mortgage market. While maintaining the familiar 30-year term the typical adjustable rate loan in subprime is designed as a hybrid of fixed and adjustable characteristics. In its most prevalent form, the first two years are typically fixed and the remaining 28 years adjustable. Perhaps not surprisingly, using a competing risks proportional hazard framework that also accounts for unobserved heterogeneity, hybrid loans are sensitive to rising interest rates and tend to temporarily terminate at ...
Working Papers , Paper 2006-042

Journal Article
Has the housing boom increased mortgage risk?

Southwest Economy , Issue Sep , Pages 1-6

Journal Article
Call to ARMS

FRBSF Economic Letter

Journal Article
Consumer guide to nontraditional mortgages published

Financial Update , Volume 19 , Issue Q 4

Working Paper
The Mortgage Cash Flow Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission: A Tale of Two Countries

We study the mortgage cash flow channel of monetary policy transmission under fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) versus adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) regimes by comparing the United States with primarily long-term FRMs and Spain with primarily ARMs that automatically reset annually. We find a robust transmission of mortgage rate changes to spending in both countries but surprisingly a larger effect in the United States—and provide two explanations for this finding. First, there are channels of transmission other than the mortgage cash flow effect since other interest rates co-move with the mortgage ...
Working Papers , Paper 21-8

Discussion Paper
Why are Adjustable Rate Mortgages So Rare These Days?

The fraction of mortgage borrowers who choose an adjustable-rate loan has fallen significantly over the past five years or so. Although the fraction edged up slightly in 2010, it remains close to historic lows, with less than 10 percent of mortgage originations since 2009 featuring an adjustable interest rate. What explains the striking decline? And what are its implications for borrowers and policymakers?
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20110511

Which Households Prefer ARMs vs. Fixed-Rate Mortgages?

Adjustable-rate mortgages appear to be more popular with younger, higher-income households that also have bigger mortgages, according to 2019 data.
On the Economy

Journal Article
Why is the market share of adjustable-rate mortgages so low?

Over the past several years, U.S. homebuyers have increasingly favored fixed-rate mortgages over adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs). Indeed, ARMs have dropped to less than 10 percent of all residential mortgage originations, a near-record low. One might speculate that the decline in the ARM share has been driven by ?one-off? factors relating to the financial crisis. However, a statistical analysis suggests that recent trends can largely be explained by the same factors that have historically shaped mortgage choice?most notably, the term structure of interest rates and its effects on the ...
Current Issues in Economics and Finance , Volume 16 , Issue Dec

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