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Keywords:Stock exchanges 

Working Paper
The economic effects of violent conflict: evidence from asset market reactions
This paper studies the effects of conflict onset on asset markets applying the event study methodology. We consider a sample of 112 conflicts during the period 1974-2004 and find that a sizeable fraction of them had a significant impact on stock market indices and on major commodity prices. Furthermore, our results suggest that we are more likely to see investor reactions in response to conflicts that occur in highly polarized settings, possibly because the expected duration and intensity of the conflict is higher.
AUTHORS: Guidolin, Massimo; Eliana La Ferrara
DATE: 2005

Working Paper
Investigating the intertemporal risk-return relation in international stock markets with the component GARCH model
We revisit the risk-return relation using the component GARCH model and international daily MSCI stock market data. In contrast with the previous evidence obtained from weekly and monthly data, daily data show that the relation is positive in almost all markets and often statistically significant. Likelihood ratio tests reject the standard GARCH model in favor of the component GARCH model, which strengthens the evidence for a positive risk-return tradeoff. Consistent with U.S. evidence, the long-run component of volatility is a more important determinant of the conditional equity premium than the short-run component for most international markets.
AUTHORS: Guo, Hui; Neely, Christopher J.
DATE: 2006

Working Paper
The economic effects of violent conflict: evidence from asset market reactions
This paper studies the effects of conflict onset on asset markets applying the event study methodology. We consider a sample of 112 conflicts during the period 1974-2004 and find that a sizeable fraction of them had a significant impact on stock market indices and on major commodity prices. Furthermore, our results suggest that we are more likely to see investor reactions in response to conflicts that occur in highly polarized settings, possibly because the expected duration and intensity of the conflict is higher.
AUTHORS: Guidolin, Massimo; Eliana La Ferrara
DATE: 2005

Working Paper
What tames the Celtic tiger? portfolio implications from a multivariate Markov switching model
We use multivariate regime switching vector autoregressive models to characterize the time-varying linkages among the Irish stock market, one of the top world performers of the 1990s, and the US and UK stock markets. We find that two regimes, characterized as bear and bull states, are required to characterize the dynamics of excess equity returns both at the univariate and multivariate level. This implies that the regimes driving the small open economy stock market are largely synchronous with those typical of the major markets. However, despite the existence of a persistent bull state in which the correlations among Irish and UK and US excess returns are low, we find that state comovements involving the three markets are so relevant to reduce the optimal mean variance weight carried by ISEQ stocks to at most one-quarter of the overall equity portfolio. We compute time-varying Sharpe ratios and recursive mean-variance portfolio weights and document that a regime switching framework produces out-of-sample portfolio performance that outperforms simpler models that ignore regimes. These results appear robust to endogenizing the effects of dynamics in spot exchange rates on excess stock returns.
AUTHORS: Guidolin, Massimo; Hyde, Stuart
DATE: 2007

Working Paper
On the cross section of conditionally expected stock returns
In this paper, we use macrovariables advocated by recent authors to make out-of-sample forecast for returns on individual stocks and then sort stocks equally into ten portfolios on this proxy of conditionally expected returns. The average returns increase monotonically from the first decile (stocks with the lowest expected returns) to the tenth decile (stocks with the highest expected returns), and the difference between the tenth and first deciles is a significant 4.8 percent per year. While these portfolios pose a challenge to the CAPM, they appear to be explained by Carhart's (1997) four-factor model. Our results indicate that the CAPM anomalies might not be attributed entirely to data snooping or irrational pricing because they are correlated with systematic movements of the macrovariables that forecast stock market returns.
AUTHORS: Guo, Hui; Savickas, Robert
DATE: 2003

Working Paper
Equity portfolio diversification under time-varying predictability and comovements: evidence from Ireland, the US, and the UK
We use multivariate regime switching vector autoregressive models to characterize the time-varying linkages among short-term interest rates (monetary policy) and stock returns in the Irish, the US and UK markets. We find that two regimes, characterized as bear and bull states, are required to characterize the dynamics of returns and short-term rates. This implies that we cannot reject the hypothesis that the regimes driving the markets in the small open economy are largely synchronous with those typical of the major markets. We compute time-varying Sharpe ratios and recursive mean-variance portfolio weights and document that a regime switching framework produces out-of-sample portfolio performance that outperforms simpler models that ignore regimes. Interestingly, the portfolio shares derived under regime switching dynamics implies a fairly low commitment to the Irish market, in spite of its brilliant unconditional risk-return trade-off.
AUTHORS: Guidolin, Massimo; Hyde, Stuart
DATE: 2008

Conference Paper
Globalization of financial markets: international supervisory and regulatory issues
AUTHORS: Lamfalussy, Alexandre
DATE: 1988

Working Paper
What can bank supervisors learn from equity markets? a comparison of the factors affecting market-based risk measures and BOPEC scores
Much recent academic attention has focused on the relative ability of markets and bank supervisors to assess the risk of depository institutions. We add to that literature by comparing the factors influencing bank holding company risk, as gauged by equity markets, with the factors influencing the confidential BOPEC scores, as awarded by bank supervisors. Specifically, we regress stock market measures of holding company risk and BOPEC scores on a host of on- and off-balance sheet risk measures taken from the Federal Reserve*s Consolidated Financial Statements for Bank Holding Companies (FR Y-9C reports). Our sample includes data from 1988 through 1993. We estimate regressions year by year on a sample of 98 holding companies, with yearly observations ranging from 69 to 79. The results suggest that both equity markets and regulators closely scrutinize credit risk. Beyond that, the results suggest that regulators pay close attention to capital strength. Taken together, the evidence supports the view that the stock market emphasizes risk-return trade-offs, whereas regulators care more about probability of failure.
AUTHORS: Hall, John R.; Meyer, Andrew P.; King, Thomas B.; Vaughan, Mark D.
DATE: 2002

Working Paper
Market timing with aggregate and idiosyncratic stock volatilities
Guo and Savickas [2005] show that aggregate stock market volatility and average idiosyncratic stock volatility jointly forecast stock returns. In this paper, we quantify the economic significance of their results from the perspective of a portfolio manager. That is, we evaluate the performance, e.g., the Sharpe ratio and Jensen's alpha, of a mean-variance manager who tries to time the market based on those two variables. We find that, over the period 1968-2004, the associated market-timing strategy outperforms the buy-and-hold strategy, and the difference is statistically and economically significant.
AUTHORS: Guo, Hui; Higbee, Jason
DATE: 2006

Working Paper
Equity market volatility and expected risk premium
This paper revisits the time-series relation between the conditional risk premium and variance of the equity market portfolio. The main innovation is that we construct a measure of the ex ante equity market risk premium using corporate bond yield spread data. This measure is forward-looking and does not rely critically on either realized equity returns or instrumental variables. We find strong support for a positive risk-return tradeoff, and this result is not sensitive to a number of robustness checks, including alternative proxies of the conditional stock variance and controls for hedging demands.
AUTHORS: Chen, Long; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lu
DATE: 2006

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