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Keywords:State finance 

Report
Reading the fine print: how details matter in tax and expenditure limitations

At least 30 states, including Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, operate under ?tax and expenditure limitations? (TELs): formula-based budgeting requirements that apply specific limits to expenditures, appropriations, or revenue collections by state or local government. More than a dozen states considered TELs in 2006. Legislation proposing a new TEL to further limit General Fund appropriations in Rhode Island was introduced; Maine citizens will vote on a more restrictive TEL this November. ; Several factors, including a desire for lower taxes and a belief that additional ...
New England Public Policy Center Research Report , Paper 06-3

Working Paper
Measuring fiscal disparities across the U. S. states: a representative revenue system/representative expenditure system approach, fiscal year 2002

States and their local governments vary both in their needs to provide basic public services and in their abilities to raise revenues to pay for those services. A joint study by the Tax Policy Center and the New England Policy Center at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston uses the Representative Revenue System (RRS) and the Representative Expenditure System (RES) frameworks to quantify these disparities across states by comparing each state?s revenue capacity, revenue effort, and necessary expenditures to the average capacity, effort, and need in states across the country for fiscal year 2002. ...
New England Public Policy Center Working Paper , Paper 06-2

Journal Article
Fuzzy federal funds stymie governors' planning

Fiscal Facts , Issue Spr , Pages 1-3

Journal Article
How will New Hampshire solve its school funding problem? part 2 of 3

Ever since the New Hampshire Supreme Court decided in Claremont II that the local property tax used to fund K-12 public education was unconstitutional, policymakers have struggled to find a permanent solution to the school finance problem. In 1999, the legislature enacted an interim funding plan centered around a temporary statewide property tax. The price tag of providing New Hampshire students with an "adequate" education was set at $825 million in spending, but the funding plan raised revenues of only about $725 million. Thus, lawmakers were aware that they would have to revisit the ...
Fiscal Facts , Issue Fall , Pages 1-5

Journal Article
Will accountability standards improve public schools? (Accountability and education reform, part 4)

Fiscal Facts , Issue Win , Pages 1-5

Journal Article
How will New Hampshire solve its school funding problem?: part 3 of 3

Ever since the New Hampshire Supreme Court decided in Claremont II that the local property tax used to fund K-12 public education was unconstitutional, policymakers have struggled to find a permanent solution to the school finance problem. In June 2001, after a rancorous two-year public debate, and nearly four years after the Claremont II decision, policymakers enacted a second plan that made the statewide property tax permanent and added sufficient supplemental revenues to finance the legislature's definition of the amount required to fund an "adequate" education. However, the school ...
Fiscal Facts , Issue Win , Pages 1-8

Journal Article
Are foundation grant programs a panacea or a problem? (Accountability and education reform, part 3)

Fiscal Facts , Issue Fall , Pages 1-6

Journal Article
Will the current boom encourage states to spend too much?

Fiscal Facts , Issue Spr/Sum , Pages 1-4

Journal Article
Lessons from variations in state Medicaid expenditures

Because Medicaid is absorbing a large and growing share of government spending in every state, policymakers are under intense pressure to control the cost of this budget-breaking program. In search of clues concerning Medicaid cost containment, this article examines state data on per-recipient Medicaid spending by type of service. This effort suggests focusing on nursing homes, because per-recipient payments to these institutions are highly variable across states. Indeed, the article concludes that a key explanation for cross-state differences in per-recipient Medicaid expenses is the ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jan , Pages 43-66

Journal Article
State business tax climate: how should it be measured and how important is it?

States are more concerned than ever before about their business tax climate. Over the past two decades, profound technological and political changes have enhanced employers' geographic mobility and extended their geographic range, thereby intensifying economic competition both within the United States and throughout the world. This study ranks the business tax climate of 22 states, including the six within New England. It finds only modest differences in business tax climate among most states. Within the region, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have the most attractive business tax climates.> ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jan , Pages 23-38

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