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Keywords:Rental housing - New England 

Briefing
The New England rental market

New England?s rental prices are high but relatively affordable to most residents.
New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief

Journal Article
Mapping New England: rent as a percentage of income, by county

The maximum rent in public housing, established by the 1981 Housing and Community Development Act, is 30 percent of family income. Using that as a benchmark for all renters?and looking at the American Community Survey?s data on gross rent as a percentage of income? can suggest the rent burden for New Englanders. Gross rent includes estimated utility payments, often a large percentage of the rent in lower-rent households.
Communities and Banking , Issue Winter , Pages 7

Journal Article
The myth of the irresponsible investor: analysis of southern New England's small multifamily properties

Comparing the borrowing trends of owner-occupants versus investors in small multifamily properties reveals that investors may not engage in as much risky behavior as public sentiment leads one to expect. The authors investigate data from Southern New England and debunk several myths about the ?irresponsible investor.?
New England Community Developments

Discussion Paper
The housing bust and housing affordability in New England

This discussion paper updates the Center's 2006 housing affordability working paper, drawing on housing market data through 2008 to provide an in-depth analysis of housing affordability after the recent housing market bust. The paper looks at affordability in the New England states, their largest metropolitan areas, competitor metropolitan areas, and for the nation. The results show that as New England's housing prices have declined, affordability has been returning to the pre-housing crisis levels of the early 2000s. However, declining prices nationwide continue to make owner-occupied ...
New England Public Policy Center Discussion Paper , Paper 10-1

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