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Keywords:Productivity 

Speech
Summary of the Report on the Competitiveness of Puerto Rico's Economy

Remarks before the Puerto Rico Chamber of Commerce Annual Convention, Fajardo, Puerto Rico.
Speech , Paper 86

Journal Article
Foreign direct investment, productivity, and country growth: an overview

The authors review the empirical literature that studies the relationship between foreign direct investment, productivity, and growth using aggregate data and focus on two questions: Is there evidence of a positive relationship between foreign direct investment and national growth? And does the output of the "multinational sectors" exhibit higher labor productivity? The authors also briefly discuss how the microeconomic evidence and a number of aggregation and composition problems might help explain the ambiguous results in this literature.
Review , Volume 91 , Issue Mar

Journal Article
Monetary policy and the new normal

Is the economy in for a prolonged spell of slow growth, as some believe, or a burst of innovation and productivity? In either event, policymakers must pay close attention to productivity trends.
Economic Insights , Volume 1 , Issue 1 , Pages 1-4

Journal Article
Globalization: threat or opportunity for the U.S. economy?

This Economic Letter is adapted from remarks delivered to the Hawaii Society of Investment Professionals in Honolulu on April 29, 2004.
FRBSF Economic Letter

Working Paper
The role of real wages, productivity, and fiscal policy in Germany's Great Depression, 1928-37

We study the behavior of output, employment, consumption, and investment in Germany during the Great Depression of 1928-37. In this time period, real wages were countercyclical, and productivity and fiscal policy was procyclical. We use the neoclassical growth model to investigate how much these factors contribute to the depression. We find that real wages, which were significantly above their market clearing levels, were the most important factor for the economic decline in the depression. Changes in productivity and fiscal policy were also important for the decline and recovery. Even though ...
Working Paper , Paper 01-07

Journal Article
Nation and southeast set for modest recovery in 2002

EconSouth , Volume 3 , Issue Q4 , Pages 2-7

Report
Unmeasured investment and the puzzling U.S. boom in the 1990s (technical appendix)

Staff Report , Paper 395

Report
Needed: a theory of total factor productivity

This paper evaluates the argument that differences in physical and intangible capital can account for the large international income differences that characterize the world economy today. The finding is that they cannot. Savings rate differences are of minor importance. What is all-important is total factor productivity. In addition, the paper presents industry evidence that total factor productivities differ across countries and time for reasons other than differences in the publicly available stock of technical knowledge. These findings lead me to conclude a theory of TFP is needed. This ...
Staff Report , Paper 242

Working Paper
Globalization and productivity in the United States and Germany

This paper investigates the impact of globalization on productivity growth and the procyclicality of productivity growth in manufacturing industries in the United States and Germany. For U.S. industries, the analysis suggests that changes in international demand affect productivity growth differently from changes in exposure to international competition. An increase in foreign demand for U.S. exports raises trend productivity growth, but to a lesser degree than does a similar demand shock from domestic buyers. On the other hand, whereas an increase in U.S. imports reduces trend productivity ...
International Finance Discussion Papers , Paper 595

Journal Article
Productivity and the post-1990 U.S. economy

In this paper, the authors show that ignoring corporate intangible investments gives a distorted picture of the post-1990 U.S. economy. In particular, ignoring intangible investments in the late 1990s leads one to conclude that productivity growth was modest, corporate profits were low, and corporate investment was at moderate levels. In fact, the late 1990s was a boom period for productivity growth, corporate profits, and corporate investment.
Review , Volume 87 , Issue Jul , Pages 537-550

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