Search Results

Showing results 1 to 6 of approximately 6.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Keywords:Leisure 

Working Paper
Do constraints on market work hours change home production efforts?

We study variations in housework time and leisure consumption when workers are subject to labor market work hours constraints that prevent them from working the optimal number of hours. Using data from two large nationwide longitudinal surveys, we first document that such constraints are widespread--about 50 percent of all households in our sample had been bound by such constraints in at least one year, highlighting the significance of studying household behaviors in labor markets under binding constraints. Our analysis reveals strong heterogeneity and asymmetry in workers' reactions to this ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2009-21

Working Paper
Monocentric city redux

This paper argues that centralized employment remains an empirically relevant stylization of midsize U.S. metros. It extends the monocentric model to explicitly include leisure as a source of utility but constrains workers to supply fixed labor hours. Doing so sharpens the marginal disutility from longer commutes. The numerical implementation calibrates traffic congestion to tightly match observed commute times in Portland, Oregon. The implied geographic distribution of CBD workers' residence tightly matches that of Portland. The implied population density, land price, and house price ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 14-9

Working Paper
Measuring trends in leisure: the allocation of time over five decades

In this paper, we use five decades of time-use surveys to document trends in the allocation of time. We document that a dramatic increase in leisure time lies behind the relatively stable number of market hours worked (per working-age adult) between 1965 and 2003. Specifically, we document that leisure for men increased by 6-8 hours per week (driven by a decline in market work hours) and for women by 4-8 hours per week (driven by a decline in home production work hours). This increase in leisure corresponds to roughly an additional 5 to 10 weeks of vacation per year, assuming a 40-hour work ...
Working Papers , Paper 06-2

Conference Paper
Measuring trends in leisure

In this paper, we use five decades of time-use surveys to document trends in the allocation of time. We find that a dramatic increase in leisure time lies behind the relatively stable number of market hours worked (per working-age adult) between 1965 and 2003. Specifically, we show that leisure for men increased by 6-8 hours per week (driven by a decline in market work hours) and for women by 4-8 hours per week (driven by a decline in home production work hours). This increase in leisure corresponds to roughly an additional 5 to 10 weeks of vacation per year, assuming a 40-hour work week. ...
Proceedings

Journal Article
Working hard or hardly working? the evolution of leisure in the United States

Although Americans appear to be spending less time on the job than they were a hundred years ago, there's some question as to whether they have more leisure time.
The Regional Economist , Issue Jan , Pages 10-11

Journal Article
Beautiful city

Proponents of the City Beautiful movement advocated for sizable public investments in monumental spaces, street beautification, and classical architecture. Today, economists and policymakers see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract people and jobs to cities. But past studies have provided only indirect evidence of the importance of leisure amenities for urban growth and development. In this article, Jerry Carlino uses a new data set on the number of leisure tourist visits to metropolitan areas to examine the correlation between leisure consumption opportunities and ...
Business Review , Issue Q3 , Pages 10-17

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Series

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

Aguiar, Mark 2 items

Hurst, Erik 2 items

Carlino, Gerald A. 1 items

Engemann, Kristie M. 1 items

Li, Geng 1 items

Owyang, Michael T. 1 items

show more (2)

FILTER BY Jel Classification

R12 1 items

R14 1 items

R41 1 items

FILTER BY Keywords

Leisure 6 items

Hours of labor 4 items

Cities and towns 1 items

Commuting 1 items

Urban Land Use 1 items

Urban economics 1 items

show more (2)

PREVIOUS / NEXT