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Keywords:Labor supply - New England 

Discussion Paper
Is New England experiencing a \\"brain drain\\"?: facts about demographic change and young professionals

Recent news articles and studies have generated concern among New England policy makers and others that the region?s supply of young, highly educated professionals is disappearing. The fear is that comparatively high housing and other costs may be driving away many within this highly mobile group. This paper explores trends in the stocks and flows of young professionals, defined as people 25 to 39 with at least a bachelor?s degree. The goal is to help policy makers better understand this important demographic story, giving them the facts about how various factors, including migration, are ...
New England Public Policy Center Discussion Paper , Paper 07-3

Briefing
Retention of recent college graduates in New England

This policy brief outlines basic facts about the retention of recent college graduates in New England including how we stack up against other regions, what factors affect the region's ability to retain graduates, and the reasons why recent college graduates choose to leave New England. This brief summarizes analysis in NEPPC research report 08-1: The Future of the Skilled Labor Force in the Region: The Supply of Recent College Graduates.
New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief

Briefing
Lasting connections: using internships to retain recent college graduates in New England

This policy brief discusses one promising short-term strategy for retaining the region's recent college graduates: expanding the use of internships within the region to help college students?including non-native?learn more about local job opportunities. The brief summarizes analysis in NEPPC research report 08-1: The Future of the Skilled Labor Force in the Region: The Supply of Recent College Graduates.
New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief

Briefing
The supply of recent college graduates in New England

This policy brief investigates factors affecting the region's supply of recent college graduates and how those factors have changed over time, and suggests steps that states might take to expand this source of skilled labor. This brief summarizes analysis in NEPPC research report 08-1: The Future of the Skilled Labor Force in the Region: The Supply of Recent College Graduates.
New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief

Briefing
The middle-skills gap: ensuring an adequate supply of skilled labor in northern and southern New England

Recent evidence suggests that a mismatch between the skills demanded by employers and the skills supplied by the population may be underway, particularly for ?middle-skill? workers who possess some college education or an associate?s degree. This policy brief examines the middle-skill mismatch in New England, comparing recent labor market trends and future projections for the northern versus southern subregions. The analysis finds that the nature of the mismatch varies within the region, indicating that policymakers should tailor their potential responses as opposed to taking a uniform ...
New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief

Journal Article
New England immigrants and the labor market

New England?s population has avoided an overall decline thanks to the growing numbers of immigrants. New England Public Policy Center research shows immigrants are also filling many of the region?s labor needs.
Communities and Banking , Issue Sum , Pages 12-16

Report
The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates

One of New England?s greatest assets is its skilled labor force, which has historically been an engine of economic growth in the region. But the skilled labor force of the future is growing more slowly in New England than in the rest of the United States.
Annual Report

Report
The future of the skilled labor force in New England: the supply of recent college graduates

One of New England?s greatest assets is its skilled labor force, historically an engine of economic growth in the region. Yet the population of recent college graduates?the skilled labor force of the future?has been growing more slowly in New England than elsewhere in the country. ; The need to attract and retain recent college graduates has become a salient issue in every New England state. Policymakers and business leaders alike are concerned that an inadequate supply of skilled workers will hamper economic growth by creating barriers for companies looking to locate or expand within the ...
New England Public Policy Center Research Report , Paper 08-1

Report
Mismatch in the labor market: measuring the supply of and demand for skilled labor in New England

Over the past decade, policymakers and business leaders across New England have been concerned that the region?s slower population growth and loss of residents to other parts of the U.S. will lead to a shortage of skilled labor?particularly when the baby boom generation retires. Even with the current economic downturn, there is a recognized need to ensure that there is a sufficient pipeline of skilled workers to fill their region?s high-growth, high-demand jobs when the economy recovers. This means not only having a sufficient number of skilled workers, but also a workforce with the right mix ...
New England Public Policy Center Research Report , Paper 10-2

Working Paper
Voting with their feet?: local economic conditions and migration patterns in New England

Over the past several years, policymakers and business leaders throughout New England have expressed concern regarding the region's ability to attract and retain skilled workers, given the economic climate of the region compared with other parts of the nation. Indeed, net domestic migration for New England became increasingly negative after the 2001 recession, as the number of people leaving the region exceeded those entering. Examining the factors underlying these migration trends is important for determining what role, if any, public policy might play in addressing their potential impact on ...
New England Public Policy Center Working Paper , Paper 09-1

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