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Keywords:Labor supply 

Journal Article
Big city labor markets - inner city workers

Regional Review , Issue Q4 , Pages 16-23

Working Paper
The relocation decisions of working couples

Most prime-age married couples in the U.S. today have two labor force participants. Migration decisions are more complicated for two-earner couples than for one-earner couples because any gain from moving that accrues to one spouse must be great enough to offset any loss to the other spouse. This paper estimates the extent to which internal migration is depressed by rising earnings equality among spouses. The results indicate that couples' migration propensities are substantially lower the more equal spouses' labor incomes.
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2006-33

Journal Article
What are the causes of rising wage inequality in the United States?

During the last 15 years--especially in the 1980s--wage inequality rose in the United States. It appears that this can be explained by a secular shift in production functions favoring workers with intellectual rather than manual skills, together with slower growth in the supply of skilled labor than in the previous decade.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Jan , Pages 9-17

Working Paper
Revisiting the role of home production in life-cycle labor supply

This paper revisits the argument, posed by Rupert, Rogerson, and Wright (2000), that estimates of the intertemporal elasticity of labor supply that do not account for home production are biased downward. The author uses the American Time Use Survey, a richer and more comprehensive data source than those used previously, to replicate their analysis, but he also explores how other factors interact with household and market work hours to affect the elasticity of labor supply. An exact replication of their analysis yields an elasticity of about 0.4, somewhat larger than previously estimated. Once ...
Working Papers , Paper 10-3

Working Paper
Labor supply and the Tax Reform Act of 1986: evidence from panel data

Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 95-34

Journal Article
Issues in labor supply

Federal Reserve Bulletin , Issue Jun

Working Paper
Nonparametric estimation of the impact of taxes on female labor supply

Econometric models with nonlinear budgets sets frequently arise in the study of impact of taxation on labor supply. Blomquist and Newey (2002) have suggested a nonparametric method to estimate the uncompensated wage and income effects when the budget set is nonlinear. This paper extends their nonparametric estimation method to censored dependent variables. The modified method is applied to estimate female wage and income elasticities using the 1987 PSID. I find evidence of bias if the nonlinearity in the budget set is ignored. The median compensated elasticity is estimated at 1.19 (with a ...
Working Papers , Paper 0505

Working Paper
The impact of illegal immigration and enforcement on border crime rates

Border crime rates lie consistently below the national average. In the 1990s, however, while there as a large decline in property-related crime along the U.S.-Mexico border, violent crime rates began to converge to the national average. At the same time, legal and illegal immigration from Mexico surged and border enforcement rose to unprecedented levels. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between border county crime rates, immigration and enforcement since the early 1990s. We find that while the volume of illegal immigration is not related to changes in property-related crime, ...
Working Papers , Paper 0303

Journal Article
Demographic changes produce new work-force issues

Economics Update , Issue Jul , Pages 3

Journal Article
New data on worker flows during business cycles

The most obvious economic cost of recessions is that workers become involuntarily unemployed. During the average business cycle contraction, total employment declines by about 1.5 percent, the unemployment rate rises by 2.7 percentage points, and it takes almost two years before employment recovers its pre-recession level. Both fiscal policy and monetary policy are concerned with these business cycle deviations of employment from its "full-employment" or "equilibrium" level. The aggregate statistics on employment and unemployment mask economically important information about the composition ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jul , Pages 49-76

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