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Keywords:Labor market 

Journal Article
The unemployment gender gap during the 2007 recession

Women fared decidedly better than men during the most recent recession. By August 2009, the unemployment rate for men had hit 11.0 percent, while that for women held at 8.3 percent. This 2.7 percentage point unemployment gender gap--the largest in the postwar era--appears to reflect two factors: first, men were much more heavily represented in the industries that suffered the most during the downturn. Second, there was a much sharper increase in the percentage of men who--prompted, perhaps, by a decline in household liquidity--rejoined the labor force but failed to find a job.
Current Issues in Economics and Finance , Volume 16 , Issue Feb

Journal Article
The parts are more than the whole: separating goods and services to predict core inflation

Economists have not been altogether successful in their efforts to forecast ?core? inflation?an inflation measure that typically excludes volatile food and energy prices. One possible explanation is that the models used to make these forecasts fail to distinguish the forces influencing price changes in core services from those affecting price changes in core goods. While core services inflation depends on long-run inflation expectations and the degree of slack in the labor market, core goods inflation depends on short-run inflation expectations and import prices. By using a composite model ...
Current Issues in Economics and Finance , Volume 19 , Issue Aug

Journal Article
Inequality in labor market outcomes: contrasting the 1980s and earlier decades

The increase in wage inequality during the 1980s was exceptional, but underlying demand and supply conditions showed relatively little contrast compared to previous decades. One possible explanation is that the increased demand for skills during the 1980s was unusually concentrated among the most skilled workers rather than being spread throughout the skill distribution.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Jan , Pages 26-32

Journal Article
Labor market developments in the United States and Canada since 2000: conference overview and summary of papers

These articles were presented at a conference in December 2004, convened to consider the disparity in job growth between the United States and Canada-namely, while the United States was struggling to create jobs, the number of Canadian jobs was increasing. The conference was cosponsored by the Canadian Consulate General in New York, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the New York Association for Business Economics.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 1-2

Journal Article
Commentary on The weak jobs recovery: whatever happened to \\"the great American jobs machine\\"?

Proceedings of a Conference Cosponsored by the Canadian Consulate General in New York, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and the New York Association for Business Economics.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 19-22

Journal Article
The internationalization of the U.S. labor market and the wage structure

The increasing internationalization of the U.S. labor market has had important effects on the wage structure. Immigration has probably increased wage inequality because recent immigrant waves tend to be less skilled than earlier waves. Growing trade deficits in durable goods have also increased wage inequality by reducing the relatively high wages of less-skilled workers in these industries and by displacing workers from them.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Jan , Pages 3-8

Journal Article
The recession of 2001 and unemployment insurance financing

Although the economic downturn of 2001 was one of the mildest of the past fifty years, between 2002-04, several large states experienced difficulties financing their unemployment insurance (UI) programs. Vroman discusses the recession's effects on states experiencing UI funding problems and the borrowing options available when state trust fund reserves are inadequate. Among his findings, Vroman concludes that all of the states that had to borrow had low trust fund balances at the end of December 2000-just before the recession began-and that funding problems have been concentrated among the ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 61-79

Journal Article
The weak jobs recovery: whatever happened to \\"the great American jobs machine\\"?

Authors Freeman and Rodgers find that the current recovery, which started in 2001, has been the worst in recent history in terms of job creation. They determine that the slow employment growth of the recovery is not attributable to the poor performance of a particular sector, nor is it concentrated in certain geographic areas. ; The authors conclude that the weak jobs recovery represents a major shift in the link between the labor market and the economy over the business cycle. They also find that the slow job growth has disproportionate effects on groups especially sensitive to business ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 3-18

Journal Article
Commentary on The recession of 2001 and unemployment insurance financing

Proceedings of a Conference Cosponsored by the Canadian Consulate General in New York, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and the New York Association for Business Economics.
Economic Policy Review , Issue Aug , Pages 81-84

Discussion Paper
Prospects for the U.S. Labor Market

The unemployment rate in the United States fell from 9.1 percent in the summer of 2011 to 8.3 percent in February. This decline, the largest six-month drop in the unemployment rate since 1984, has surprised many economic forecasters. The decline is even more surprising because recent real GDP growth appears to have been around trend at best, whereas in early 1984, growth was more than 7 percent. Our next six posts in Liberty Street Economics will discuss prospects for the U.S. labor market given this surprisingly quick decline in the unemployment rate. In this opening post, we outline some of ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20120326

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