Search Results

Showing results 1 to 4 of approximately 4.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Keywords:Job loss 

Working Paper
Reconsidering the Consequences of Worker Displacements : Firm versus Worker Perspective

Prior literature has established that displaced workers suffer persistent earnings losses by following workers in administrative data after mass layoffs. This literature assumes that these are involuntary separations owing to economic distress. This paper examines this assumption by matching survey data on worker-supplied reasons for separations with administrative data. Workers exhibit substantially different earnings dynamics in mass layoffs depending on the reason for separation. Using a new methodology to account for the increased separation rates across all survey responses during a mass ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2018-029

Working Paper
Parental Proximity and Earnings After Job Displacements

The earnings of young adults who live in the same neighborhoods as their parents completely recover after a job displacement, unlike the earnings of young adults who live farther away, which permanently decline. Nearby workers appear to benefit from help with childcare since grandmothers are less likely to be employed after their child's job displacement and since the earnings benefits are concentrated among young adults who have children. The result also suggests that parental employment networks improve earnings. Differences in job search durations, transfers of housing services, and ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2019-062

Journal Article
Women Take a Bigger Hit in the First Wave of Job Losses due to COVID-19

The temporary shutdown orders and social distancing measures taken to fight the COVID-19 outbreak have caused substantial job losses in the United States. Women, especially those without a college degree, have taken a bigger hit in the first wave of job losses. This imbalance could lead to prolonged damage to women’s employment and labor market attachment if job losses deepen and persist in the coming months.
Economic Bulletin , Issue April 16, 2020 , Pages 5

Working Paper
Income in the Off-Season: Household Adaptation to Yearly Work Interruptions

Joblessness is highly seasonal. To analyze how households adapt to seasonal joblessness, we introduce a measure of seasonal work interruptions premised on the idea that a seasonal worker will tend to exit employment around the same time each year. We show that an excess share of prime-age US workers experience recurrent separations spaced exactly 12 months apart. These separations coincide with aggregate seasonal downturns and are concentrated in seasonally volatile industries. Examining workers most prone to seasonal work interruptions, we find that these workers incur large earnings losses ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2020-084

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

FILTER BY Jel Classification

J63 2 items

D10 1 items

E32 1 items

J00 1 items

J20 1 items

J21 1 items

show more (6)

FILTER BY Keywords

PREVIOUS / NEXT