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Keywords:Bank loans 

Journal Article
The rise of the originate-to-distribute model and the role of banks in financial intermediation

This is the second article in a series which explores the changing role of banks in the financial intermediation process. It accompanies a Liberty Street Blog series. Both discuss the complexity of the credit intermediation chain associated with securitization and note the growing participation of nonbank entities within it. These series also discuss implications for monitoring and rulemaking going forward. In this article, the authors show that, beginning in the early 1990s, lead banks increasingly used the originate-to-distribute model in their corporate lending business and that the ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Jul , Pages 21-34

Journal Article
Using credit risk models for regulatory capital: issues and options

The authors describe the issues and options that would be associated with the development of regulatory minimum capital standards for credit risk based on banks' internal risk measurement models. Their goal is to provide a sense of the features that an internal-models (IM) approach to regulatory capital would likely incorporate, and to stimulate discussion among financial institutions, supervisors, and other interested parties about the many practical and conceptual issues involved in structuring a workable IM regulatory capital regime for credit risk. The authors focus on three main areas: ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Mar , Pages 19-36

Journal Article
Credit risk in the Australian banking sector

This paper was presented at the conference "Financial services at the crossroads: capital regulation in the twenty-first century" as part of session 2, "Credit risk modeling." The conference, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on February 26-27, 1998, was designed to encourage a consensus between the public and private sectors on an agenda for capital regulation in the new century.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 61-70

Journal Article
Capital allocation and bank management based on the quantification of credit risk

This paper was presented at the conference "Financial services at the crossroads: capital regulation in the twenty-first century" as part of session 2, "Credit risk modeling." The conference, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on February 26-27, 1998, was designed to encourage a consensus between the public and private sectors on an agenda for capital regulation in the new century.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 83-94

Journal Article
Portfolio credit risk

This paper was presented at the conference "Financial services at the crossroads: capital regulation in the twenty-first century" as part of session 2, "Credit risk modeling." The conference, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on February 26-27, 1998, was designed to encourage a consensus between the public and private sectors on an agenda for capital regulation in the new century.
Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 71-82

Journal Article
Listening to loan officers: the impact of commercial credit standards on lending and output

Over most of the last thirty-three years, the Federal Reserve has polled a small number of bank loan officers about their moves to tighten or ease commercial credit standards. Although the Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey uses a small sample and gathers only qualitative information, it proves to be a useful tool in predicting changes in commercial lending and output. The authors find a strong correlation between tighter credit standards and slower loan growth and output, even after controlling for credit demand and other predictors of lending and output. The analysis also shows that the ...
Economic Policy Review , Issue Jul , Pages 1-16

Journal Article
Commentary on four papers on credit risk modeling

Economic Policy Review , Volume 4 , Issue Oct , Pages 95-97

Journal Article
Why do banks syndicate loans?

Loan syndication, where a group of banks makes a loan jointly to a single borrower, offers several benefits. Syndication allows banks to diversify, expanding their lending to broader geographic areas and industries. Second, syndication allows banks that are constrained by their capital-asset ratios to participate in loans to larger borrowers. ; Despite these benefits, loan syndication could pose additional risks for the banking system, if the originating or lead banks withhold information about the borrower from participating banks, misleading them into making loans that are riskier than they ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jan , Pages 45-52

Journal Article
How dependent are New England's mid-sized firms on the region's largest bank holding companies?

The degree to which mid-sized firms--the "middle market"- depend on large regional banks for short-term credit is an issue particularly relevant to New England. If this dependence is heavy, then the recent consolidation among the regions large bank holding companies could be forcing its mid-sized firms to accept short-term credit on uncompetitive terms. The dependence of New Englands middle market on the regions banking institutions as a whole, both large and small, is also of concern. The greater this dependence, the more vulnerable are the regions mid-sized firms to sharp contractions ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jul , Pages 35-48

Journal Article
The advantages of \\"transferrable puts\\" for loans at failed banks

In testimony on February 3, 1992 before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the United States Senate, Richard F. Syron, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, proposed a mechanism to help relieve current credit availability problems by making existing FDIC guarantees of loans transferable throughout the private financial system. This article examines Mr. Syrons rationale for the proposal and how it might work. ; Under this scheme, when performing nonperforming loans are placed in the equivalent of "bad banks" by the FDIC, the borrower could transfer the loan ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Mar , Pages 3-11

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