Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 13.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Keywords:Baby boom generation 

Working Paper
The labor market for direct care workers

As the baby boom cohort nears retirement age, the question of how to provide necessary health care and personal services to a growing elderly population has become a looming policy problem. Beginning in 2020, the number of Americans over the age of 65 will surpass the number of primary providers of formal and informal long-term care (women between the ages of 20 and 44). Perceptions of shortage and very high turnover in today?s direct care labor market are compounding the potential problem. ; This paper provides an overview of the labor market for direct care workers in the United States, ...
New England Public Policy Center Working Paper , Paper 07-4

Conference Paper
U. S. labor supply in the twenty-first century

The American labor force will be transformed as the twenty-first century unfolds, a change that will confront policymakers and business firms with new challenges and new opportunities. The impending slowdown of labor force growth that will accompany the retirement of the baby boom generation already is playing a central role in national debates over the future solvency of Social Security and Medicare, as well as U.S. immigration policies. But labor supply changes will be influenced by other dimensions as well. In the coming decades, American workers are likely to be, on average, older and ...
Conference Series ; [Proceedings] , Volume 52

Monograph
Labor supply in the new century

To explore the labor-supply trends that will affect economic policymaking in the twenty-first century, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston chose "Labor Supply in the New Century? as the theme for its 52nd Annual Economic Conference held in June 2007. The conference?s six papers and its keynote address by Eugene Steuerle provide a broad overview of the quantity and quality implications of labor-supply trends.
Monograph , Paper 52

Working Paper
Population aging, labor demand, and the structure of wages

One consequence of demographic change is substantial shifts in the age distribution of the working age population. As the baby boom generation ages, the usual historical pattern of there being a high ratio of younger workers relative to older workers is increasingly being replaced by a pattern of there being roughly equal percentages of workers of different ages. One might expect that the increasing relative supply of older workers would lower the wage premium paid for older, more experienced workers. ; This paper provides strong empirical support for this hypothesis. Econometric estimates ...
Working Papers , Paper 07-8

Conference Paper
The effect of population aging on aggregate labor supply in the United States

Output growth is determined by growth in labor productivity and growth in labor input. Over the past two decades, technological developments have changed how many economists think about growth in labor productivity. However, in the coming decades, the aging of the population will change how economists think about the growth in labor input in the United States. As the oldest baby boomers born in 1946 turned 50, then 55, and then 60, an important economic change has slowly surfaced: these people have become less likely to participate in the labor force. While this shift was obscured by a labor ...
Conference Series ; [Proceedings] , Volume 52

Journal Article
As boomers slow down, so might the economy

Baby boomers will start retiring in droves in January. Coupled with the slowdown in productivity and the near-zero saving rate, growth in GDP could fall to levels not seen in 25 years.
The Regional Economist , Issue Jul , Pages 12-13

Conference Paper
Labor supply in the new century

To explore the labor-supply trends that will affect economic policymaking in the twenty-first century, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston chose "Labor Supply in the New Century? as the theme for its 52nd Annual Economic Conference held in June 2007. The conference?s six papers and its keynote address by Eugene Steuerle provide a broad overview of the quantity and quality implications of labor-supply trends.
Conference Series ; [Proceedings] , Volume 52

Conference Paper
The labor supply of older American men

This chapter summarizes what is known about the labor supply of older American men, defined as those aged 55 years and over. The topic is of great interest because in the coming decades older individuals will comprise a much greater portion of the U.S. population, so the labor supply of older adults will have a significant impact on national output, tax revenues, and the cost of means-tested programs. Most importantly, a greater proportion of older individuals will need to remain in the workforce than is the present case, because the retirement income system is contracting and working longer ...
Conference Series ; [Proceedings] , Volume 52

Monograph
The effect of population aging on aggregate labor supply in the United States

Output growth is determined by growth in labor productivity and growth in labor input. Over the past two decades, technological developments have changed how many economists think about growth in labor productivity. However, in the coming decades, the aging of the population will change how economists think about the growth in labor input in the United States. As the oldest baby boomers born in 1946 turned 50, then 55, and then 60, an important economic change has slowly surfaced: these people have become less likely to participate in the labor force. While this shift was obscured by a labor ...
Monograph , Paper 52

Journal Article
The golden years dilemma

With 3.2 million baby boomers eligible to retire this year, how many will be able to meet daily financial needs and still preserve home equity? The author advises seniors to plan carefully and learn about the many forms of assistance available.
Communities and Banking , Issue Sum , Pages 16-19

PREVIOUS / NEXT