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Keywords:Automobile industry and trade 

Working Paper
A primer on global auto markets

Working Paper Series, Regional Economic Issues , Paper 93-1

Working Paper
Lean manufacturing and the decision to vertically integrate: some empirical evidence from the U.S. automobile industry

The introduction of a new manufacturing system provides a unique opportunity to analyze its effects on the governance structure of vertical relationships. This paper focuses on the possible effects of lean manufacturing on the decision to vertically integrate. Transaction cost theory provides the framework for the analysis. Lean manufacturing is characterized by a high degree of mutual commitment between up- and downstream firms; this is expected to lead to the formation of contractual vertical relationships. This analysis utilizes a new data set obtained directly from U.S. automobile ...
Working Paper Series, Regional Economic Issues , Paper 94-1

Working Paper
Comparing location decisions of domestic and foreign auto supplier plants

Plant locations in the U.S. auto industry have been moving southward for some time now. This paper utilizes a comprehensive dataset of the U.S. auto industry and focuses on plant location decisions of auto supplier plants that were opened less than 15 years ago in the U.S. We find that agglomeration continues to matter: suppliers want to be close to each other as well as to their assembly plant customers. We also find evidence of differences in location factors for domestic and foreign suppliers. Foreign suppliers exhibit a stronger preference to be near highways, other foreign suppliers and ...
Working Paper Series , Paper WP-04-27

Working Paper
Geographic concentration in U.S. manufacturing: evidence from the U.S. auto supplier industry

This paper investigates the issue of geographic concentration for the auto supplier industry by means of a large plant-level data set representing information for the year 1997. The industry continues to be highly spatially concentrated, even though its core region has changed over the last few decades and is now represented by the auto corridor, extending south from Michigan to Tennessee. Analysis at the more disaggregate level of individual parts suggests transportation costs, economies of scale and spillover effects as factors underlying the aggregate spatial pattern of the industry.
Working Paper Series , Paper WP-98-17

Journal Article
How lean manufacturing changes the way we understand the manufacturing sector

Economic Perspectives , Volume 17 , Issue May

Journal Article
Determinants of supplier plant location: evidence from the auto industry

Economic Perspectives , Volume 29 , Issue Q III

Journal Article
Assessing global auto trends

Economic Perspectives , Volume 17 , Issue Mar

Journal Article
The geographic evolution of the U.S. auto industry (pt. 2)

The authors examine changes in the footprint of the auto industry in the United States, starting in 1980 and tracking them through 2003. Their formal analysis of assembly and supplier plant locations traces the reorientation of the auto region from one that extends east?west to one that stretches north?south over this period. To accommodate the large size of the file and the number of illustrations, the article has been divided into two smaller files.
Economic Perspectives , Volume 30 , Issue Q II

Journal Article
The geographic evolution of the U.S. auto industry (pt. 1)

The authors examine changes in the footprint of the auto industry in the United States, starting in 1980 and tracking them through 2003. Their formal analysis of assembly and supplier plant locations traces the reorientation of the auto region from one that extends east?west to one that stretches north?south over this period. To accommodate the large size of the file and the number of illustrations, the article has been divided into two smaller files.
Economic Perspectives , Volume 30 , Issue Q II , Pages 2-6

Journal Article
Agglomeration in the U.S. auto supplier industry

Analysis of a large set of plant-level data shows the auto supplier industry to be highly spatially concentrated. Data on location of the plants' customers, however, suggest that immediate proximity to assembly plant is not necessary, despite a production system that emphasized low inventories and tight linkages.
Economic Perspectives , Volume 23 , Issue Q I , Pages 18-34

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Klier, Thomas H. 19 items

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