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Keywords:Agricultural productivity 

Journal Article
Farming in the shadow of suburbia
AUTHORS: Katz, Jane
DATE: 1997

Working Paper
Off-farm labor supply and fertilizer use
I develop a two-period stochastic dynamic programming model to explain the interaction between fertilizer use and off-farm labor supply. Using a well-known sample of Indian farmers, I find that fertilizer use responds strongly to the village wage and that irrigation raises fertilizer use, while larger farmers use less fertilizer (per acre) than smaller ones. Response to one-sided production shocks, is stronger for female labor, indicating that it is more important for smoothing consumption than male labor.
AUTHORS: Lamb, Russell L.
DATE: 1996

Journal Article
Supplies and prices of agricultural commodities
AUTHORS: anonymous
DATE: 1949

Journal Article
The agricultural situation
AUTHORS: anonymous
DATE: 1955

Journal Article
The balance sheet of agriculture, 1955
AUTHORS: Garlock, F. L.; Jones, L. A.; Bierman, R. W.; Taylor, M. M.; Scofield, W. H.
DATE: 1955

Journal Article
The balance sheet of agriculture, 1959
AUTHORS: anonymous
DATE: 1959

Journal Article
The balance sheet of agriculture, 1958
AUTHORS: anonymous
DATE: 1958

Journal Article
The farm slump continues
The century's final year was one of frustration for U.S. agriculture - certainly not the way the industry had hoped to close the millennium. Farmers took pride> in their productivity, turning out the fourth bin-busting crop in a row and more red meat and poultry than ever before. But the big production collided with a still sluggish world market, holding down farm commodity prices. Still, farm income held up well above the average for the past decade, due to another big financial assistance package from Washington.> The farm slump will likely continue in the year ahead, although prospects for livestock and crop producers diverge widely. Livestock producers could have a very good year, with low feed costs and robust consumer demand boosting profits, but weak crop prices could drag down farm income. The farm export picture is beginning to brighten again, but too gradually to offer much relief in 2000. With exports soft and the nation's granaries still full, weak crop prices could be the norm. As in the last two years, help from Washington may determine whether farm income in 2000 rises or falls.
AUTHORS: Barkema, Alan
DATE: 2000

Journal Article
U.S. agriculture at the crossroads in 1999
Markets for U.S. farm products took a sudden, unexpected turn for the worse in 1998, as supply and demand factors combined to produce a plunge in crop prices. Most parts of the nation had very favorable growing conditions in 1998, resulting in an abundant harvest of the major crops, and pushing prices lower. Likewise, the supply of red meat products in the marketplace soared, as both beef and pork producers boosted production, with pork production hitting a record high. But as supply soared, demand weakened. In particular, the economic crisis in Asia led to a drop in ag exports to many Asian countries. And problems in Asia also contributed to a slowdown in world economic growth more generally, and thus global demand for U.S. farm products slumped.> Lamb reviews the year just past for U.S. agriculture and suggests that, after the gyrations of 1998, the year ahead is one of particular uncertainty. The outlook for farm income depends critically on the role the government will play in the farm sector. If the government grants farmers another round of additional government subsidies, then farm income will likely hold steady. If government subsidies retreat from the high levels of 1998, however, farm income could fall sharply in 1999.
AUTHORS: Lamb, Russell L.
DATE: 1999

Journal Article
The farm slump eases
Another big package of government financial aid cushioned the farm slump in 2000 but did little to lift agriculture's spirit. Overall, the industry's major financial indicators stayed remarkably healthy. Farmers delivered more red meat and poultry to supermarkets than ever before, and strong consumer demand in the robust U.S. economy boosted livestock prices and profits. But another big crop swamped still sluggish global markets, and weak crop prices held down farm incomes. In the end, help from Washington propped up the industry's financial indicators for the third consecutive year.> Barkema and Novack report that some signs of improvement in the industry have emerged, but, as in the year just past, the outlook for 2001 hinges on the weather and Washington. Global food consumption has caught up with agriculture's recent production surge, tightening world grain supplies and brightening prospects for farm exports. Nevertheless, normal weather and another big crop are likely to keep U.S. granaries full and crop prices low. Livestock producers could have another good year, but weak crop prices could hold down farm income. As in the past three years, agriculture's prospects in 2001 may rest on financial assistance from Washington.
AUTHORS: Novack, Nancy; Barkema, Alan
DATE: 2000

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