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Series:New England Economic Review 

Journal Article
Lessons from variations in state Medicaid expenditures

Because Medicaid is absorbing a large and growing share of government spending in every state, policymakers are under intense pressure to control the cost of this budget-breaking program. In search of clues concerning Medicaid cost containment, this article examines state data on per-recipient Medicaid spending by type of service. This effort suggests focusing on nursing homes, because per-recipient payments to these institutions are highly variable across states. Indeed, the article concludes that a key explanation for cross-state differences in per-recipient Medicaid expenses is the ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jan , Pages 43-66

Journal Article
Spatial and labor market contributions to earnings inequality: an overview

New England Economic Review , Issue May , Pages 1-10

Journal Article
Are stocks overvalued?

By most standards, the price of equities in the United States has risen remarkably rapidly during the last 15 years. Since 1994 alone, the Standard & Poor's index of 500 stock prices has doubled. Although the rapid growth of corporations' profits has propelled the price of their stock, shareholders also are willing to pay a greater price per dollar of their companies' profits, and the valuation of corporations' earnings is now nearly as high as it has been since World War II. For the moment, the value of equity may rest on the growth of earnings, but in the longer run the price of stocks ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Sep , Pages 21-40

Journal Article
Unemployment insurance policy in New England: background and issues

Almost two-thirds of the states, and all the New England states except New Hampshire, have exhausted their unemployment insurance trust fund and borrowed from the federal government at least once during the past 35 years. Under such circumstances, states are required by law to raise unemployment insurance taxes in order to replenish their trust funds and to pay off their debts to the federal government. Since higher unemployment insurance taxes increase employer costs, replenishment forces states into a trade-off between economic competitiveness and trust fund adequacy. In recent years, ...
New England Economic Review , Issue May , Pages 3-22

Journal Article
Taking charge: should New England increase its reliance on user charges?

New England relies less on user charges for its state and local revenues than any other region of the country. As a result, some policymakers maintain that increases in user charges would correct an "imbalance" in the regions revenue mix. However, the national mix of state and local revenues is not necessarily the best mix for the states of New England. The degree to which a state should rely on u. ser charges depends on the priorities of its policymakers among competing principles of taxation, the conditions under which each principle favors user charges over taxes, and the extent to which ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jan , Pages 56-74

Journal Article
The role of savings and investment in balancing the current account: some empirical evidence from the United States

Current account deficits ultimately reflect a disparity between a country's national savings and investment. As such, the issue of how current account balance is achieved in practice can be viewed in terms of whether it is savings or investment that adjusts to an external deficit. In this article, the author examines empirically how savings and investment have responded to current account imbalances in the United States over the past 40 years. The main finding is that, on average, investment was largely responsible for rebalancing the current account in the long run. The finding that ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jul , Pages 3-14

Journal Article
Globalization and U.S. inflation

Estimates of the Phillips curve suggest that the low level of unemployment over the last few years should have produced a fairly significant increase in the rate of inflation, yet inflation has continued to fall. Some take this occurrence as evidence that the NAIRU has declined. Others argue that social factors, such as recent movements of employee health coverage to health maintenance organizations have temporarily masked inflation. Perhaps the most widely cited explanation for the surprisingly good inflation performance of late concerns the increasing sensitivity of the U.S. economy to ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Jul , Pages 21-33

Journal Article
The Bank of England's monetary policy

As the second oldest and perhaps the most renowned central bank, the Bank of England could provide some important insights into issues that may confront the Federal Reserve System in the future.
New England Economic Review , Issue Q 2 , Pages 61-64

Journal Article
The changing American attitude toward debt, and its consequences

The American people no longer view the government budget deficit as a significant problem. This represents a radical change in the attitude of Americans from thirty years ago, when even small deficits were viewed with great concern. People are not much concerned about our long string of trade deficits, either. Moreover, there is no perception of the linkage between the federal budget deficit and the trade deficit. ; The author describes the factors that have produced this change in American values, drawing on his own experience in government. He goes on to assess the consequences, past and ...
New England Economic Review , Issue May , Pages 34-39

Journal Article
Shifts in the Beveridge Curve, job matching, and labor market dynamics

The Beveridge curve -- the scatter plot of unemployment rates versus vacancy rates -- has recently shifted inward dramatically. While the Beveridge curve is often used to summarize the state of the labor market, it is not a structural economic relationship. Thus, in order to understand the labor market implications of recent shifts in the curve, we must first understand the labor market activities that give rise to the Beveridge curve.> This article examines the Beveridge curve over the past 30 years. The authors discuss some of the issues surrounding the job-matching process and attempt to ...
New England Economic Review , Issue Sep , Pages 3-19

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Kopcke, Richard W. 27 items

Little, Jane Sneddon 26 items

Rosengren, Eric S. 26 items

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Bradbury, Katharine L. 21 items

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