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Author:Zabek, Mike 

Working Paper
Parental Proximity and Earnings After Job Displacements

The earnings of young adults who live in the same neighborhoods as their parents completely recover after a job displacement, unlike the earnings of young adults who live farther away, which permanently decline. Nearby workers appear to benefit from help with childcare since grandmothers are less likely to be employed after their child's job displacement and since the earnings benefits are concentrated among young adults who have children. The result also suggests that parental employment networks improve earnings. Differences in job search durations, transfers of housing services, and ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2019-062

Discussion Paper
The 2008 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice

This paper presents the 2008 version of the Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC), a nationally representative survey developed by the Consumer Payments Research Center of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and implemented by the RAND Corporation with its American Life Panel. The survey fills a gap in knowledge about the role of consumers in the transformation of payments from paper to electronic by providing a broad-based assessment of U.S. consumers' adoption and use of nine payment instruments, including cash. The average consumer has 5.1 of the nine instruments, and uses 4.2 in a ...
Public Policy Discussion Paper , Paper 09-10

Report
Update on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households: July 2020 Results

In March 2020, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic altered the financial landscape for many American families. Recognizing the unprecedented financial disruptions caused by the pandemic, the Federal Reserve conducted a pair of supplemental surveys to monitor the financial well-being of U.S. households. The first was fielded in April 2020, and the results were described in the Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2019, Featuring Supplemental Data from April 2020. This report describes the responses to the second supplemental survey, fielded in July 2020. The combined results ...
Reports and Studies

Report
Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2018

This report describes the responses to the sixth annual Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED). The goal of the survey is to share the wide range of financial challenges and opportunities facing individuals and households in the United States.1 For many, the findings are positive; however, areas of distress and fragility remain. The survey also reveals how households view their own financial lives and the many decisions they face, from education to retirement.
Reports and Studies

Working Paper
Local Ties in Spatial Equilibrium

If someone lives in an economically depressed place, they were probably born there. The presence of people with local ties - a preference to live in their birthplace - leads to smaller migration responses. Smaller migration responses to wage declines lead to lower real incomes and make real incomes more sensitive to subsequent demand shocks, a form of hysteresis. Local ties can persist for generations. Place-based policies, like tax subsidies, targeting depressed places cause smaller distortions since few people want to move to depressed places. Place-based policies targeting productive ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2019-080

Report
Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2018

This report describes the responses to the sixth annual Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED). The goal of the survey is to share the wide range of financial challenges and opportunities facing individuals and households in the United States.1 For many, the findings are positive; however, areas of distress and fragility remain. The survey also reveals how households view their own financial lives and the many decisions they face, from education to retirement.
Reports and Studies

Report
Update on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households: July 2020 Results

In March 2020, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic altered the financial landscape for many American families. Recognizing the unprecedented financial disruptions caused by the pandemic, the Federal Reserve conducted a pair of supplemental surveys to monitor the financial well-being of U.S. households. The first was fielded in April 2020, and the results were described in the Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2019, Featuring Supplemental Data from April 2020. This report describes the responses to the second supplemental survey, fielded in July 2020. The combined results ...
Reports and Studies

Discussion Paper
The 2009 survey of consumer payment choice

This paper presents results of the 2009 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC), along with revised 2008 SCPC data. In 2009, the average U.S. consumer held 5.0 of the nine payment instruments available, including cash, and used 3.8 of them during a typical month. Between the 2008 and 2009 surveys, a period that includes the trough of the latest recession, consumers significantly increased their use of cash and close substitutes for cash, such as money orders and prepaid cards. At the same time, consumers reduced their use of credit cards and (to a lesser extent) debit cards, as well as ...
Public Policy Discussion Paper , Paper 11-1

Report
Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2019, Featuring Supplemental Data from April 2020

This report describes the responses to the 2019 Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) as well as responses to a follow-up survey conducted in April 2020. The Federal Reserve Board has fielded this survey each fall since 2013 to understand the wide range of financial challenges and opportunities facing families in the United States.
Reports and Studies

Working Paper
Parental Proximity and Earnings after Job Displacements

Young adults, ages 25 to 35, who live in the same neighborhoods as their parents experience stronger earnings recoveries after a job displacement than those who live farther away. This result is driven by smaller on-impact wage reductions and sharper recoveries in both hours and wages. We show that geographic mobility, different job search durations, housing transfers, and ex-ante differences between individuals are unlikely explanations. Our findings are consistent with a framework in which some individuals living near their parents face a better wage-offer distribution, though we find no ...
Working Papers (Old Series) , Paper 1722

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