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Author:Neumark, David 

Working Paper
Can we improve preliminary estimates of payroll employment growth?
AUTHORS: Neumark, David; Wascher, William L.
DATE: 1989

Working Paper
Declining union strength and wage inflation in the 1980s
AUTHORS: Neumark, David
DATE: 1989

Working Paper
Is superwoman a myth? marriage, children, and wages
AUTHORS: Neumark, David; Korenman, Sanders
DATE: 1989

Working Paper
Employment effects of minimum and subminimum wages: reply to Card, Katz, and Krueger
AUTHORS: Neumark, David; Wascher, William L.
DATE: 1993

Journal Article
Job creation policies and the Great Recession
The adverse labor market effects of the Great Recession have intensified interest in policy efforts to spur job creation. The two most direct job creation policies are subsidies that go to workers and hiring credits that go to employers. Evidence indicates that worker subsidies are generally more effective at creating jobs. However, the unique circumstances of recovery from the Great Recession, especially the weak demand for labor, make hiring credits more effective in the short term.
AUTHORS: Neumark, David
DATE: 2012

Journal Article
Age Discrimination and Hiring of Older Workers
Population aging and the consequent increased financial burden on the U.S. Social Security system is driving new proposals for program reform. One major reform goal is to create stronger incentives for older individuals to stay in the workforce longer. However, hiring discrimination against older workers creates demand-side barriers that limit the effectiveness of these supply-side reforms. Evidence from a field experiment designed to test for hiring discrimination indicates that age discrimination makes it harder for older individuals, especially women, to get hired into new jobs.
AUTHORS: Burn, Ian; Neumark, David; Button, Patrick
DATE: 2017

Journal Article
Reducing poverty via minimum wages, alternatives
Setting a higher minimum wage seems like a natural way to help lift families out of poverty. However, minimum wages target individual workers with low wages, rather than families with low incomes. As a result, a large share of the higher income from minimum wages flows to higher-income families. Other policies that directly address low family income, such as the earned income tax credit, are more effective at reducing poverty.
AUTHORS: Neumark, David
DATE: 2015

Journal Article
Will increasing the minimum wage help the poor?
Minimum wages help some families to escape poverty, but employment losses associated with raising the minimum also appear to cause some families to fall into poverty. The authors' estimates suggest that on balance, the second of these effects outweighs the first; therefore, the net result of raising the minimum wage is an increase in the proportion of poor families.
AUTHORS: Wascher, William L.; Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark E.
DATE: 1999-02

Journal Article
Do place-based policies matter?
Place-based policies such as enterprise zones offer economic incentives to firms to create jobs in economically challenged areas. Evidence on the effectiveness of enterprise zones is mixed. There is no clear indication that they successfully create jobs. However, positive effects are evident for other policies, including discretionary subsidies that target specific firms, infrastructure spending that targets specific areas, and investment in higher education and university research.
AUTHORS: Neumark, David; Simpson, Helen
DATE: 2015

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