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Author:King, Thomas B. 

Working Paper
Did FDICIA enhance market discipline on community banks? a look at evidence from the jumbo-CD market

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (FDICIA) directed the FDIC to resolve bank failures in the least costly manner, shifting more of the failure-resolution burden to jumbo-CD holders. We examine the sensitivity of jumbo-CD yields and runoffs to failure risk before and after FDICIA. We also examine the economic significance of estimated risk sensitivities before and after the Act, looking at the implied impact of risk on bank funding costs and profits. The evidence indicates that yields and runoff were sensitive to risk before and after FDICIA, but that this ...
Supervisory Policy Analysis Working Papers , Paper 2002-04

Working Paper
Discipline and liquidity in the market for federal funds

I find that high-risk banks pay more for federal funds and are less likely to utilize them as a source of liquidity. The extent of this discipline has risen in recent years, following legislation designed to impose more of the costs of bank failure on uninsured creditors. However, the risk-pricing remains imperfect, and additional results suggest that information problems persist in the fed-funds market. The findings have implications for interest-rate determination, risk contagion in the financial system, the use of market data in banking supervision, and recent efforts to reform Discount ...
Supervisory Policy Analysis Working Papers , Paper 2003-02

Journal Article
Are the causes of bank distress changing? can researchers keep up?

Since 1990, the banking sector has experienced enormous legislative, technological, and financial changes, yet research into the causes of bank distress has slowed. One consequence is that traditional supervisory surveillance models may not capture important risks inherent in the current banking environment. After reviewing the history of these models, the authors provide empirical evidence that the characteristics of failing banks have changed in the past ten years and argue that the time is right for new research that employs new empirical techniques. In particular, dynamic models that use ...
Review , Volume 88 , Issue Jan , Pages 57-80

Newsletter
Macroeconomic Sources of Recent Interest Rate Fluctuations

The authors use a new statistical method to attribute daily changes in U.S. Treasury yields and inflation compensation to changes in investor beliefs about domestic and foreign growth, inflation, and monetary policy. They find that while foreign developments have been important drivers of U.S. yields and expected inflation over the last decade, the recent divergence between U.S. and European monetary policy has had little effect. Instead, the behavior of asset prices seems consistent with positive ?aggregate supply shocks.? One candidate for such shocks is the large decline in energy prices ...
Chicago Fed Letter

Journal Article
Derivatives and Collateral at U.S. Life Insurers

Although insurers represent a relatively small part of the derivatives markets, they are an interesting case study, in part because they report very detailed information about their derivatives positions and associated collateral in quarterly regulatory filings. The authors exploit these data to study how derivatives are used by insurers and analyze the likely impact of regulatory reforms on their business models.
Economic Perspectives , Issue Q I , Pages 21-37

Discussion Paper
Macroeconomic Sources of Recent Interest Rate Fluctuations

The authors use a new statistical method to attribute daily changes in U.S. Treasury yields and inflation compensation to changes in investor beliefs about domestic and foreign growth, inflation, and monetary policy.
FEDS Notes , Paper 2016-06-02

Working Paper
Flow and stock effects of large-scale asset purchases: evidence on the importance of local supply

The Federal Reserve's 2009 program to purchase $300 billion of U.S. Treasury securities represented an unprecedented intervention in the Treasury market and provides a natural experiment with the potential to shed light on the price elasticities of Treasuries and theories of supply effects in the term structure. Using security-level data on Treasury prices and quantities during the course of this program, we document a `local supply' effect in the yield curve?yields within a particular maturity sector responded more to changes in the amounts outstanding in that sector than to similar changes ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2012-44

Working Paper
Are the causes of bank distress changing? can researchers keep up?

Since 1990, the banking sector has experienced enormous legislative, technological and financial changes, yet research into the causes of bank distress has slowed. One consequence is that current supervisory surveillance models may no longer accurately represent the banking environment. After reviewing the history of these models, we provide empirical evidence that the characteristics of failing banks has changed in the last ten years and argue that the time is right for new research employing new empirical techniques. In particular, dynamic models that utilize forward-looking variables and ...
Supervisory Policy Analysis Working Papers , Paper 2004-07

Working Paper
Credit Risk, Liquidity and Lies

We reexamine the relative effects of credit risk and liquidity in the interbank market using bank-level panel data on Libor submissions and CDS spreads. Our model synthesizes previous work by combining the fundamental determinants of interbank spreads with the effects of strategic misreporting by Libor-submitting firms. We find that interbank spreads were very sensitive to credit risk at the peak of the crisis. However, liquidity premia constitute the bulk of those spreads on average, and Federal Reserve interventions coincide with improvements in liquidity at short maturities. Accounting for ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2015-112

Working Paper
Flow and stock effects of large-scale Treasury purchases

Using a panel of daily CUSIP-level data, we study the effects of the Federal Reserve's program to purchase $300 billion of U.S. Treasury coupon securities announced and implemented during 2009. This program represented an unprecedented intervention in the Treasury market and thus allows us to shed light on the price elasticities and substitutability of Treasuries, preferred-habitat theories of the term structure, and the ability of large-scale asset purchases to reduce overall yields and improve market functioning. We find that each purchase operation, on average, caused a decline in yields ...
Finance and Economics Discussion Series , Paper 2010-52

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