Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 22.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Author:Hall, Robert E. 

Working Paper
Why Has the US Economy Recovered So Consistently from Every Recession in the Past 70 Years?

It is a remarkable fact about the historical US business cycle that, after unemployment reached its peak in a recession, and a recovery began, the annual reduction in the unemployment rate was stable at around 0.55 percentage points per year. The economy seems to have had an irresistible force toward restoring full employment. There was high variation in monetary and fiscal policy, and in productivity and labor-force growth, but little variation in the rate of decline of unemployment. We explore models of the labor market's self-recovery that imply gradual working off of unemployment ...
Working Paper Series , Paper 2020-20

Working Paper
The Inexorable Recoveries of U.S. Unemployment

Unemployment recoveries in the US have been inexorable. Between 1949 and 2019, the annual reduction in the unemployment rate during cyclical recoveries was tightly distributed around 0.1 log points per year. The economy seems to have an irresistible force toward restoring full employment. Unless another crisis intervenes, unemployment continues to glide down to a level of approximately 3.5 percentage points. Occasionally unemployment rises rapidly during an economic crisis, while most the time, unemployment declines slowly and smoothly at a near-constant proportional rate. We show that ...
Working Paper Series , Paper 2021-20

Working Paper
Why Has the US Economy Recovered So Consistently from Every Recession in the Past 70 Years?

It is a remarkable fact about the historical US business cycle that, after unemployment reached its peak in a recession, and a recovery began, the annual reduction in the unemployment rate was stable at around 0.55 percentage points per year. The economy seems to have had an irresistible force toward restoring full employment. There was high variation in monetary and fiscal policy, and in productivity and labor-force growth, but little variation in the rate of decline of unemployment. We explore models of the labor market's self-recovery that imply gradual working off of unemployment ...
Working Paper Series , Paper 20

Conference Paper
Cyclical movements along the labor supply function

A consensus in macroeconomics holds that the observed higher-frequency movements in employment and hours of work are movements along a labor-supply function caused by shifts of the labor demand function. Recent theoretical thinking has extended this view to include fluctuations in unemployment, so that macroeconomists can speak coherently of movements along an unemployment function caused by shifts in labor demand.
Conference Series ; [Proceedings] , Volume 52

Conference Paper
Monetary strategy with an elastic price standard

Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole

Conference Paper
The value of life and the rise in health spending

Health care extends life. Over the past half century, Americans spent a rising share of total economic resources on health and enjoyed substantially longer lives as a result. Debate on health policy often focuses on limiting the growth of health spending. We investigate an issue central to this debate: Is the growth of health spending the rational response to changing economic conditions - notably the growth of income per person? We develop a model based on standard economic assumptions and argue that this is indeed the case. Standard preferences - of the kind used widely in economics to ...
Proceedings

Conference Paper
Separating the business cycle from other economic fluctuations

Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole , Issue Aug , Pages 133-179

Conference Paper
The routes into and out of the zero lower bound

Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole

Journal Article
The Disappointing Recovery in U.S. Output after 2009

U.S. output has expanded only slowly since the recession trough in 2009, counter to normal expectations of a rapid cyclical recovery. Removing cyclical effects reveals that the deep recession was superimposed on a sharply slowing trend in underlying growth. The slowing trend reflects two factors: slow growth of innovation and declining labor force participation. Both of these powerful adverse forces were in place before the recession and, thus, were not the result of the financial crisis or policy changes since 2009.
FRBSF Economic Letter

Conference Paper
Dynamics of corporate earnings

Earnings are the flow of value created by corporations. I concentrate on the concept called EBITDA-earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. This measure captures the results of the substantive non-financial activities of corporations and corresponds to the rental price of capital multiplied by the quantity of capital. I measure earnings per dollar of capital for all U.S. corporations and at the level of 35 U.S. industries. I develop a competitive benchmark for the level of earnings, which takes account of adjustment costs, taxes, depreciation, and the financial ...
Proceedings , Issue Mar

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

FILTER BY Jel Classification

J63 5 items

E32 4 items

J64 4 items

E24 1 items

PREVIOUS / NEXT