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Author:Brown, Jason 

Journal Article
Update on the Kansas and Missouri economies

Midwest Economist , Issue Q I

Working Paper
Response of Consumer Debt to Income Shocks: The Case of Energy Booms and Busts

This paper investigates how consumers respond to local income shocks as a result of booms and busts in oil and gas development. Oil and gas development generates potentially large streams of income via wages and salaries to workers and royalty income to mineral rights owners. Changes in development may lead consumers to increase their spending depending on their exposure to income shocks. Using quarterly information on consumer debt and oil and gas activity, I ?nd that consumer debt increased at a peak of $840 per capita in counties with shale endowment and increased drilling. Each well ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 17-5

Working Paper
Death of Coal and Breath of Life: The Effect of Power Plant Closure on Local Air Quality

The number of U.S. coal-fired power plants declined by nearly 250 between 2001 and 2018. Given that burning coal generates large amounts of particulate matter, which is known to have adverse health effects, the closure of a coal-fired power plant should improve local air quality. Using spatial panel data from air quality monitor stations and coal-fired power plants, we estimate the relationship between plant closure and local air quality. We find that on average, the levels of particulate matter within 25 and 50 mile buffers around air quality monitors declined between 7 and 14 percent with ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 20-15

Working Paper
Asset Ownership, Windfalls, and Income: Evidence from Oil and Gas Royalties

How does local versus absentee ownership of natural resources?and their associated income?shape the relationship between extraction and local income? Theory and empirics on natural resources and the broader economy have focused heavily on labor markets, largely ignoring the economic implications of payments to resource owners. We study how local ownership of oil and gas rights shapes the local income effects of extraction. For the average U.S. county that experienced an increase in oil and gas production from 2000 to 2013, increased royalty income and its associated economic stimulus ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 16-12

Working Paper
Rural wealth creation and emerging energy industries: lease and royalty payments to farm households and businesses

New technologies for accessing energy resources, changes in global energy markets, and government policies have encouraged growth in the natural gas and wind industries in the 2000s. The growth has offered new opportunities for wealth creation in many rural areas. At a local level, households who own land or mineral rights can benefit from energy development through lease and royalty payments. Using nationally-representative data on U.S. farms from 2011, we assess the consumption, investment, and wealth implications of the $2.3 billion in lease and royalty payments that energy companies paid ...
Research Working Paper , Paper RWP 13-07

Journal Article
Update on Kansas and Missouri economies

Midwest Economist , Issue Q III

Journal Article
Production of natural gas from shale in local economies: a resource blessing or curse?

Innovations in the energy sector, particularly the extraction of natural gas from shale and tight gas formations using horizontal drilling and "fracking," have helped increase U.S. reserves of natural gas to an estimated 70 years' worth of supply. Some theories suggest such a boom leads to a local resource "blessing" in employment and a positive spillover into the local economy while others suggest a boom leads to a resource "curse" for industries not related to the energy sector. Brown examines county-level labor market conditions in the central United States and finds a modest ...
Economic Review , Issue Q I , Pages 1-29

Journal Article
Drilling Productivity in the United States: What Lies Beneath

We construct new measures of drilling productivity and find that productivity increased sixfold from the mid-2000s to early 2017. Gains in below-ground efficiency?the number of barrels produced per foot of drilled wells?have largely driven this increase in overall productivity. The large oil price declines during the Great Recession and from 2014 to 2016 also played a role. However, further large increases in productivity are unlikely absent additional improvements in technology or a subsequent large downturn in oil prices.
Economic Bulletin , Issue May 22, 2019 , Pages 5

Journal Article
Identifying State-Level Recessions

Economic Review , Issue Q I , Pages 85-108

Journal Article
U.S. electricity prices in the wake of growing natural gas production.

Main Street Economist , Issue 2 , Pages 1-8

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