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Author:Braun, Helge 

Journal Article
Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations
The authors use structural vector autoregressions to analyze the responses of worker flows, job flows, vacancies, and hours to demand and supply shocks. They identify these shocks by restricting the short-run responses of output and the price level. On the demand side, they disentangle a monetary and nonmonetary shock by restricting the response of the interest rate. The responses of labor market variables are similar across shocks: Expansionary shocks increase job creation, the job-finding rate, vacancies, and hours; and they decrease job destruction and the separation rate. Supply shocks have more persistent effects than demand shocks. Demand and supply shocks are equally important in driving business cycle fluctuations of labor market variables. The authors' findings for demand shocks are robust to alternative identification schemes involving the response of labor productivity at different horizons. Supply shocks identified by restricting productivity generate a higher fraction of impulse responses inconsistent with standard search and matching models.
AUTHORS: DiCecio, Riccardo; Braun, Helge; Reinout De Bock
DATE: 2009-05

Working Paper
Aggregate shocks and labor market fluctuations
This paper evaluates the dynamic response of worker flows, job flows, and vacancies to aggregate shocks in a structural vector autoregression. We identify demand, monetary, and technology shocks by imposing sign restrictions on the responses of output, inflation, the interest rate, and the relative price of investment. No restrictions are placed on the responses of job and worker flows variables. We find that both investment-specific and neutral technology shocks generate responses to job and worker flows variables that are qualitatively similar to those induced by monetary and demand shocks. However, technology shocks have more persistent effects. The job finding rate largely drives the response of unemployment, though the separation rate explains up to one third. For job flows, the destruction margin is more important than the creation margin in driving employment growth. Measuring reallocation from job flows, we find that monetary and demand shocks do not have significant effects on cumulative job reallocation, whereas expansionary technology shocks have mildly negative effects. We also estimate shock-specific matching functions. Allowing for a break in 1984:Q1 shows considerable subsample differences in matching elasticities and relative shock-specific efficiency.
AUTHORS: Braun, Helge; DiCecio, Riccardo; Reinout De Bock
DATE: 2006

Working Paper
Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations
We use structural vector autoregressions to analyze the responses of worker flows, job flows, vacancies, and hours to shocks. We identify demand and supply shocks by restricting the short-run responses of output and the price level. On the demand side we disentangle a monetary and non-monetary shock by restricting the response of the interest rate. The responses of labor market variables are similar across shocks: expansionary shocks increase job creation, the hiring rate, vacancies, and hours. They decrease job destruction and the separation rate. Supply shocks have more persistent effects than demand shocks. Demand and supply shocks are equally important in driving business cycle fluctuations of labor market variables. Our findings for demand shocks are robust to alternative identification schemes involving the response of labor productivity at different horizons and an alternative specification of the VAR. However, supply shocks identified by restricting productivity generate a higher fraction of responses inconsistent with standard search and matching models.
AUTHORS: Braun, Helge; DiCecio, Riccardo; Reinout De Bock
DATE: 2007

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