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Author:Borgos, Ricardo 

Discussion Paper
Understanding foreclosures in Massachusetts
Recent increases in foreclosure rates in New England and other parts of the United States are raising concerns. Distressful for individual borrowers and potentially destabilizing for their communities, the negative effects of foreclosures flow beyond the impact on housing markets and the financial consequences for creditors. Public officials, lenders, current and potential homeowners, community organizations, and other stakeholders are paying careful attention. ; In low- and moderate-income communities in New England, community leaders view current trends as especially worrisome. Among possible explanations, they stress the expansion of high-cost and subprime lending in these communities; and they cite aggressive or unscrupulous mortgage practices, and even mortgage fraud. Historically, however, other factors have been responsible for foreclosure activity. Regional job losses, rising interest rates, weak housing markets, and stretched borrowers facing negative life events are among the factors that usually push up foreclosure rates. And even critics of current mortgage lending practices acknowledge that homeownership is an effective asset-building strategy and that expanding the availability of credit to previously underserved population groups is a worthy goal. ; This paper describes recent trends in New England foreclosure rates, discusses possible causes, and looks at the prevalence of foreclosures in Massachusetts cities and towns with significant populations of low- and moderate-income households. It finds that the prevalence of higher cost lending is associated with higher foreclosure rates.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo; Chakrabarti, Prabal; Reade, Julia
DATE: 2007

Journal Article
Mapping New England: concentration of poverty
In 2000, 9 percent of New England?s population lived below the poverty level, and more than 5 percent of the region?s communities had poverty levels higher that 20 percent.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2006-10

Journal Article
Mapping New England: number of businesses rise in most New England counties
About 85 percent of all New England counties saw an increase in the number of business establishments from 1998 to 2003. Most of the counties with loss were located in Vermont and Connecticut.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2006-07

Journal Article
Mapping New England: high concentrations of Brazilians in southern New England
According to the U.S. Census, 23.2 percent of the more than 200,000 Brazilians living in the United States in 2000 made their home in New England.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2006-01

Journal Article
Tackling foreclosure
With foreclosure rates rising nationwide, public officials, financial institutions, and community organizations are launching prevention programs and educating housing counselors and attorneys on the issue.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2007-04

Journal Article
Mapping New England: farm concentration
In New England, the greatest concentration of farms is often in the most urban counties.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2005-10

Journal Article
Mapping New England
According to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2005 American Community Survey, 35.5 percent of the population 25 years and older in southern New England counties have a bachelor's degree or higher. Nationwide the percentage is 27.2.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2007-01

Journal Article
Mapping New England: higher-priced refinance loans in southern New England
In New England, 12 percent of refinance loans were higher-priced. Higher-priced refinance loans were much less common in eastern Massachusetts than in other parts of southern New England.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2006-04

Journal Article
Mapping New England: 2005 housing permits in New England
Housing permits in New England increased from 57,872 in 2004 to 58,742 in 2005, with Rhode Island experiencing the greatest uptick. The map shows 2005 housing permits relative to population.
AUTHORS: Borgos, Ricardo
DATE: 2007-04

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