Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 15.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Author:Ball, Laurence 

Journal Article
Commentary on \\"the monetary policy debate since October 1979: lessons for theory and practice\\"

Review , Volume 87 , Issue Mar , Pages 263-268

Working Paper
Imperfect information and staggered price setting

Research Working Paper , Paper 86-08

Conference Paper
What do budget deficits do?

Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole

Journal Article
What causes inflation?

Business Review , Issue Mar , Pages 3-12

Journal Article
How do forecasts respond to changes in monetary policy?

Laurence Ball and Dean Croushore look at forecasts from the Survey of Professional Forecasters to determine if forecasts and the economy respond in tandem or if there are significant differences.
Business Review , Issue Q4 , Pages 9-16

Journal Article
How costly is disinflation? The historical evidence

Business Review , Issue Nov , Pages 17-28

Working Paper
What determines the sacrifice ratio?

Working Papers , Paper 93-21

Working Paper
Expectations and the effects of monetary policy

This paper examines the predictive power of shifts in monetary policy, as measured by changes in the real federal funds rate, for output, inflation, and survey expectations of these variables. The authors find that policy shifts have larger effects on actual output than on expected output; thus policy predicts errors in output expectations, a violation of rational expectations. Policy shifts do not predict errors in inflation expectations. The authors explain these results with a model in which agents systematically underestimate the effects of policy on aggregate demand. This model helps to ...
Working Papers , Paper 01-12

Working Paper
Relative-price changes as aggregate supply shocks

Working Papers , Paper 93-13

Working Paper
Expectations and the effects of monetary policy

This paper examines the predictive power of shifts in monetary policy, as measured by changes in the real federal funds rate, for output, inflation, and survey expectations of these variables. The authors find that policy shifts have larger effects on actual output than on expected output, suggesting that agents underestimate the effects of policy on aggregate demand. Their results help explain the real effects of monetary policy, and they provide negative evidence on the rationality of expectations.
Working Papers , Paper 98-13

PREVIOUS / NEXT