Search Results

Showing results 1 to 2 of approximately 2.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Author:Angela Deng 

Discussion Paper
Available for Sale? Understanding Bank Securities Portfolios
It?s natural to think of banks as intermediaries that take in deposits and use them to make loans to businesses and individuals. But in fact, loans make up only 45 percent of the assets of U.S. banking organizations. What?s the rest? A large chunk, representing 24 percent of total assets, is accounted for by securities, such as U.S. Treasury and foreign government bonds, mortgage-backed securities (MBS), municipal and corporate bonds, and equities. In this post, we take a tour of bank securities portfolios, making use of charts and statistics from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York?s report on Quarterly Trends for Consolidated U.S. Banking Organizations. We also discuss reasons why securities represent such a significant part of U.S. banking firm balance sheets.
AUTHORS: Vickery, James; Angela Deng; Tara Sullivan
DATE: 2/11/2015

Discussion Paper
Are BHCs Mimicking the Fed's Stress Test Results?
In March, the Federal Reserve and thirty-one large bank holding companies (BHCs) disclosed their annual Dodd-Frank Act stress test (DFAST) results. This is the third year in which both the BHCs and the Fed have published their projections. In a previous post, we looked at whether the Fed?s and the BHCs? stress test results are converging in the aggregate and found mixed results. In this post, we look at stress test projections made by individual BHCs. If the Fed?s projections are very different from a BHC?s in one year, do the BHC projections change in the following year to close this gap? Or are year-to-year changes in BHC stress test projections driven more by changes in underlying risk factors? Evidence of BHCs mimicking the Fed would be problematic if it meant that the BHCs are not really independently modelling their own risks. Convergence poses a potential risk to the financial system, since a financial system with monoculture in risk measurement models could be less stable than one in which firms use diverse models that collectively might be more likely to identify emerging risks.
AUTHORS: Angela Deng; Hirtle, Beverly; Kovner, Anna
DATE: 9/21/2015

FILTER BY Bank

FILTER BY Series

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Author

FILTER BY Jel Classification

G2 2 items

FILTER BY Keywords

Stress tests 1 items

bank 1 items

bank capital 1 items

risk 1 items

securities 1 items

PREVIOUS / NEXT