Search Results

Showing results 1 to 10 of approximately 23.

(refine search)
SORT BY: PREVIOUS / NEXT
Author:Afonso, Gara M. 

Working Paper
A Model of the Federal Funds Market: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

The landscape of the federal funds market changed drastically in the wake of the Great Recession as large-scale asset purchase programs left depository institutions awash with reserves, and new regulations made it more costly for these institutions to lend. As traditional levers for implementing monetary policy became less effective, the Federal Reserve introduced new tools to implement the target range for the federal funds rate, changing this landscape even more. In this paper, we develop a model that is capable of reproducing the main features of the federal funds market, as observed ...
Working Papers , Paper 18-10

Report
The over-the-counter theory of the fed funds market: a primer

We present a dynamic over-the-counter model of the fed funds market, and use it to study the determination of the fed funds rate, the volume of loans traded, and the intraday evolution of the distribution of reserve balances across banks. We also investigate the implications of changes in the market structure, as well as the effects of central bank policy instruments such as open market operations, the Discount Window lending rate, and the interest rate on bank reserves.
Staff Reports , Paper 660

Report
An empirical study of trade dynamics in the interbank market

We use minute-by-minute daily transaction-level payments data to document the cross-sectional and time-series behavior of the estimated prices and quantities negotiated by commercial banks in the fed funds market. We study the frequency and volume of trade, the size distribution of loans, the distribution of bilateral fed funds rates, and the intraday dynamics of the reserve balances held by commercial banks. We find evidence of the importance of the liquidity provision achieved by commercial banks that act as de facto intermediaries of fed funds.
Staff Reports , Paper 550

Discussion Paper
What Do Rating Agencies Think about “Too-Big-to-Fail” since Dodd-Frank

Did the Dodd-Frank Act end ??too-big-to-fail?? (TBTF)? In this series of two posts, we look at this question through the lens of rating agencies and financial markets. Today we begin by discussing rating agencies? views on this topic.
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20150629

Report
Monetary Policy Implementation with an Ample Supply of Reserves

Methods of monetary policy implementation continue to change. The level of reserve supply—scarce, abundant, or somewhere in between—has implications for the efficiency and effectiveness of an implementation regime. The money market events of September 2019 highlight the need for an analytical framework to better understand implementation regimes. We discuss major issues relevant to the choice of an implementation regime, using a parsimonious framework and drawing from the experience in the United States since the 2007-09 financial crisis. We find that the optimal level of reserve supply ...
Staff Reports , Paper 910

Discussion Paper
Who’s Lending in the Federal Funds Market?

The fed funds market is important to the framework and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. The Federal Open Market Committee sets a target level or range for the fed funds rate and directs the Trading Desk of the New York Fed to create ?conditions in reserve markets? that will encourage fed funds to trade at the target level. In this post, we use various publicly available data sources to estimate the size and composition of fed funds lending activity. We find that the fed funds market has shrunk considerably since the financial crisis and that lending activity is now dominated by one ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20131202

Report
Liquidity and congestion

This paper studies the relationship between the endogenous arrival of investors to a market and liquidity in a search-based model of asset trading. Entry of investors causes two contradictory effects. First, it reduces trading costs, which attracts new investors (the externality effect). But second, as investors concentrate on one side of the market, the market becomes ?congested,? decreasing the returns to investing and discouraging new investors from entering (the congestion effect). The equilibrium level of liquidity depends on which of the two effects dominates. When congestion is the ...
Staff Reports , Paper 349

Report
Precautionary Demand and Liquidity in Payment Systems

In large-value real-time gross settlement payment systems, banks rely heavily on incoming funds to finance outgoing payments. Such reliance necessitates a high degree of coordination and synchronization. We construct a model of a payment system calibrated for the U.S. Fedwire system and examine the impact of realistic disruptions motivated by the recent financial crisis. In such settings, individually cautious behavior can have a significant and detrimental impact on the overall functioning of the payment system through a multiplier effect. Our results quantify the mutually reinforcing nature ...
Staff Reports , Paper 352

Discussion Paper
What Do Bond Markets Think about \\"Too-Big-to-Fail\\" Since Dodd-Frank?

As we discussed in our post on Monday, the Dodd-Frank Act includes provisions to address whether banks remain ?too big to fail.? Title II of the Act creates an orderly liquidation mechanism for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) to resolve failed systemically important financial institutions (SIFIs). In December 2013, the FDIC outlined a ?single point of entry? (SPOE) strategy for resolving failing SIFIs that, in principle, should obviate bailouts. Under the SPOE, the FDIC will be appointed receiver of the top-tier parent holding company, and losses of a subsidiary bank will be ...
Liberty Street Economics , Paper 20150701

Report
A model of the federal funds market: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

The landscape of the federal funds market changed drastically in the wake of the Great Recession as large-scale asset purchase programs left depository institutions awash with reserves and new regulations made it more costly for these institutions to lend. As traditional levers for implementing monetary policy became less effective, the Federal Reserve introduced new tools to implement the target range for the federal funds rate, changing this landscape even more. In this paper, we develop a model that is capable of reproducing the main features of the federal funds market, as observed before ...
Staff Reports , Paper 840

FILTER BY year

FILTER BY Content Type

FILTER BY Jel Classification

E44 9 items

G21 7 items

E42 5 items

C78 4 items

D83 4 items

E58 4 items

show more (19)

FILTER BY Keywords

PREVIOUS / NEXT