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Keywords:Export controls 

Journal Article
Economic issues in 1974

Review , Volume 55 , Issue Oct , Pages 14-19

Journal Article
At stake in the U.S.-Canada free trade agreement: modest gains or a significant setback

New England Economic Review , Issue May , Pages 3-20

Journal Article
Export Alaskan oil?

FRBSF Economic Letter

Journal Article
Statement to Congress, April 22, 1986 (role of Federal Reserve in implementing the Bank Export Services Act)

Federal Reserve Bulletin , Issue Jun

Journal Article
Export Alaskan oil?

FRBSF Economic Letter

Journal Article
Using the gravity model to estimate the costs of protection

Many economists expend a lot of energy decrying trade protectionism; nonetheless, their estimates of the actual burden that protectionism imposes on the economy have been surprisingly small. In this article, Howard J. Wall presents a method that captures some of the effects and distortions of trade protection which have not been captured by existing methods. Wall finds that during 1996, worldwide protectionism reduced U.S. exports by 26.2 percent. Likewise, U.S. protectionism decreased U.S. imports from non-NAFTA countries by 15.4 percent. He calculates further that the welfare cost of U.S. ...
Review , Issue Jan

Journal Article
The dubious success of export subsidies for wheat

Review , Issue Nov , Pages 38-47

Journal Article
Statement to Congress, March 4, 1986 (role of Federal Reserve in implementing Bank Export Services Act)

Federal Reserve Bulletin , Issue May

Journal Article
Statements to Congress, March 24-25, 1987(bank-affiliated export trading companies)

Federal Reserve Bulletin , Issue May , Pages 341-346

Working Paper
Endogenous export subsidies and welfare under domestic cost heterogeneity

We present a model of Cournot rivalry where domestic and foreign firms compete in a third-country market, and where the domestic export subsidy is determined by lobbying. Greater domestic cost heterogeneity (a mean-preserving spread of the marginal costs of the domestic firms) means that the subsidy level, aggregate domestic output, and domestic market share will all be higher. However, the effect of heterogeneity on domestic welfare is ambiguous. From a near-symmetric initial situation, greater domestic cost-heterogeneity reduces domestic welfare if the number of domestic firms exceeds some ...
Working Papers , Paper 1999-017

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