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Author:Rubenstein, James M. 

Newsletter
Who really made your car?

In the past few decades, the evolving relations between automakers and their parts suppliers have resulted in shifts in the location of production across North America. The authors explore the ongoing structural changes to the automotive industry and explain their local, regional, and international implications.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue Oct

Newsletter
After the perfect storm: What’s next for the auto industry?

Amid the global recession in 2008?09, the U.S. auto industry experienced its worst downturn in recent memory. While conditions have improved in 2010, questions about which factors will shape the industry?s competitiveness remain. The Chicago Fed hosted a conference on May 10?11, 2010, at its Detroit Branch to explore the industry?s past, present, and future.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue Aug

Newsletter
The supplier industry in transition - the new geography of auto production

On April 18 and 19, 2006, the Chicago Fed held a conference at its Detroit Branch to examine the ongoing structural changes in the U.S. auto industry. As suppliers play an increasingly central role in auto production, it has become crucial for carmakers to have a strong relationship with their supply base.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue Aug

Newsletter
Competition and trade in the U.S. auto parts sector

Exports of U.S. made auto parts have stalled in recent years, while import levels of auto parts have continued to increase. The authors detail the magnitude and destination of U.S. imports and exports of specific auto parts in order to assess the challenges facing U.S. parts suppliers.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue Jan

Newsletter
Making cars smarter: The growing role of electronics in automobiles

Electronics make up nearly 40% of the content of today?s average new automobile, and their share will continue to grow. On June 2, 2011, as part of the eighteenth annual Automotive Outlook Symposium (AOS), the Chicago Fed hosted a panel of experts at its Detroit Branch to examine the current and future roles of electronics in motor vehicles.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue Oct

Conference Paper
The evolving geography of production - is manufacturing activity moving out of the Midwest? Evidence from the auto industry

Assessing the Midwest Economy , Paper SP-3

Journal Article
Mexico’s Growing Role in the Auto Industry Under NAFTA: Who Makes What and What Goes Where

In this article, we explore the impact of NAFTA on Mexico?s motor vehicle industry?specifically, on Mexico?s integration into North America?s automotive industry and the subsequent increase in intra-industry trade in automobiles.5 The auto industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past 20-plus years. First, we provide a brief summary of the history of auto production and related trade policies in Mexico before NAFTA. Then we provide a detailed analysis of Mexico?s light vehicle production and exports from 1990 through 2016. Our analysis shows how Mexico has become an integral part of ...
Economic Perspectives , Issue 6 , Pages 1-29

Journal Article
Detroit back from the brink? auto industry crisis and restructuring 2008–11

While it is hard to say how much of the current auto sector recovery is attributable to government intervention, the ensuing restructuring of the Detroit Three has substantially changed the industry in the U.S.
Economic Perspectives , Volume 36 , Issue Q II

Newsletter
The U.S. auto supplier industry in transition

Evolving relations between carmakers and their parts suppliers have resulted in local, regional, and international shifts in the location of production. An upcoming Chicago Fed conference in Detroit will examine these ongoing structural changes, which are affecting the prospects for the U.S. auto industry?s continued concentration in the Midwest.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue May

Newsletter
What do U.S. life insurers invest in?

Mexico?s share of automotive production has grown relative to those of its neighbors to the north because the country has become more integrated with North America and pursued trade agreements with numerous other countries. Those developments have boosted Mexico?s motor vehicle production by way of raising exports.
Chicago Fed Letter , Issue May

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