Home About Latest Browse RSS Advanced Search

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US)
Finance and Economics Discussion Series
On the economics of discrimination in credit markets
Song Han
Abstract

This paper develops a general equilibrium model of both taste-based and statistical discrimination in credit markets. We find that both types of discrimination have similar predictions for intergroup differences in loan terms. The commonly held view has been that if there exists taste-based discrimination, loans approved to minority borrowers would have higher expected profitability than to majorities with comparable credit background. We show that the validity of this profitability view depends crucially on how expected loan profitability is measured. We also show that there must exist taste-based discrimination if loans to minority borrowers have higher expected rate of return or lower expected rate of default loss than to majorities with the same exogenous characteristics at the time of loan origination. Empirical evidence on expected rate of default loss cannot reject the null hypothesis of non-existence of taste-based discrimination.


Download Full text
Download Full text
Cite this item
Song Han, On the economics of discrimination in credit markets, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-2, 2002.
More from this series
JEL Classification:
Subject headings:
Keywords: Discrimination in mortgage loans ; Discrimination in consumer credit
For corrections, contact Ryan Wolfslayer ()
Fed-in-Print is the central catalog of publications within the Federal Reserve System. It is managed and hosted by the Economic Research Division, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Privacy Legal