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Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
Working Paper Series
Do nominal rigidities matter for the transmission of technology shocks?
Zheng Liu
Louis Phaneuf
Abstract

A commonly held view is that nominal rigidities are important for the transmission of monetary policy shocks. We argue that they are also important for understanding the dynamic effects of technology shocks, especially on labor hours, wages, and prices. Based on a dynamic general equilibrium framework, our closed-form solutions reveal that a pure sticky-price model predicts correctly that hours decline following a positive technology shock, but fails to generate the observed gradual rise in the real wage and the near-constance of the nominal wage; a pure sticky-wage model does well in generating slow adjustments in the nominal wage, but it does not generate plausible dynamics of hours and the real wage. A model with both types of nominal rigidities is more successful in replicating the empirical evidence about hours, wages and prices. This finding is robust for a wide range of parameter values, including a relatively small Frisch elasticity of hours and a relatively high frequency of price reoptimization that are consistent with microeconomic evidence.


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Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, Do nominal rigidities matter for the transmission of technology shocks?, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Working Paper Series 2008-30, 2008.
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