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Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
Conference Series ; [Proceedings]
Policy implications of demographic change: panel discussion: the economic impact of demographic change: a case for more immigration
Richard N. Cooper
Abstract

By 2025, the world's population will have grown by another 1.8 billion or so, bringing it to roughly 8 billion. Ninety-five percent of the increment will be in what today are called developing countries; only 5 percent will be in the rich industrialized countries. Indeed, birth rates have fallen below the replacement rate (about 2.1 children per female of childbearing age) in all the rich countries, as well as in Slavic Europe, Russia, and China. The birth rate is down to 1.35 in Japan and to an extraordinary low of 1.2 in Italy. Demographic inertia will lead to continued population increase for a decade or more in many of these countries, especially China. But in the longer run, population (and presumably, labor force) growth will turn negative. Indeed, it is already negative in Japan.


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Richard N. Cooper, "Policy implications of demographic change: panel discussion: the economic impact of demographic change: a case for more immigration" , Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Conference Series ; [Proceedings], volume 46, pages 305-309, number y:2001:p:305-309:n:46, 2001.
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Keywords: Demography ; Economic conditions ; Emigration and immigration
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